58 Recruits joined the ranks as Michigan State Police troopers

Michigan graduates

 

A total of 58 recruits joined the ranks as Michigan State Police troopers Friday.  They are graduates of the 130th Trooper Recruit School.  After they are sworn in, they’ll be assigned to posts in different parts of the state.  Out of the 58 recruits, 14 of them will be assigned to 6 local posts: Caro, Flint, Lapeer, Mt. Pleasant, Tri Cities and West Branch.  Governor Snyder was the keynote speaker at the ceremony.

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44 new Virginia State Troopers graduate today

Virginia graduation

The Commonwealth will welcome 44 new Virginia State Troopers to the ranks Friday morning, marking the 124th generation to graduate from the State Police Training Academy.  The troopers completed 27 weeks of instruction in more than 100 different subjects, including defensive tactics, crime scene investigation, police professionalism, cultural diversity and crisis management.  Beginning Nov. 7, the troopers will be paired up with field training officers in their new patrol areas to complete a final 6-week phase of training.  The new troopers will be presented their diplomas during commencement exercises at 10 a.m. at the State Police Training Academy, 7700 Midlothian Turnpike.

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Captain Ann Assumpico becomes the first woman to take command of the Rhode Island State Police

RI New Colonel

 

A state police captain will become the first woman to take command of the Rhode Island state law enforcement agency, Governor Raimondo's office announced Thursday morning.  Capt. Ann C. Assumpico, a 59-year-old Rhode Island native, has been chosen by Raimondo.  Assumpico will succeed Col. Steven O’Donnell, who retired in September.  The governor will introduce her to the public at 11:30 Thursday morning.  O'Donnell, who retired Sept. 23 and is now chief executive of the Greater Providence YMCA, declined comment Wednesday night prior to the governor's announcement of the appointment.  On Thursday, O'Donnell said that Assumpico has "decades of law enforcement experience with 25 years "in the boots and britches of the Rhode Island state police," and she'll have the "full faith, trust and confidence" of state troopers.  "I hold her in the highest regard as I'm the person that promoted her to captain," O'Donnell said.  O'Donnell said that the organization's readiness for leadership from a woman isn't a matter that's worthy of a lot of focus.  "We don't see gender," he said. "We see a state trooper."  It is expected that O'Donnell will be joined in the State room Thursday morning by former state police commanders Steven M. Pare and Brendan Doherty.  Assumpico's ascension to superintendent would move her past a number of state police leaders who hold higher ranking positions, including the agency's interim superintendent, Lt. Col. Kevin Barry.  Assumpico, a 24-year police veteran, is director of training for the state police, which puts her at No. 7 in the chain of command.   As the agency's training director, Assumpico has overseen daily operations of the Rhode Island State Police Training Academy and the Rhode Island Municipal Police Training Academy, according to the state police website.  Prior to joining the state police, she served eight years as a corrections officer at the Adult Correctional Institutions in Cranston.  She was a member of the ACI’s tactical team, holding the rank of assistant squad leader.  She also served seven years as a police officer in Coventry.  She holds a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from Roger Williams University and a master’s degree in justice administration from Salve Regina University.

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The Florida Highway Patrol needs new recruits

 

The State of Florida is in desperate need of more troopers.  The Florida Highway Patrol is facing a shortage because of retirements.  The department is scrambling to find new recruits.  “We have a lot of people that are getting ready to retire and so we want to combat that to make sure there is not a shortage.  We want to start hiring now,” FHP recruiter Kenn Watson said.  A shortage of troopers could mean a rise in crime and longer response times, which could put lives at risk, officials said.  Recruiters have their work cut out for them. Officials say recent uprisings in Dallas and Charlotte have shown law enforcement is battling a bad reputation.  “It has become more challenging simply because of all the events that have taken place over the last year,” Watson said.  Money is also an issue.  If you want to be a trooper in New York, your starting salary is $75,252.  Iowa pays a starting salary of $49,000.  As for Florida, well, it’s the lowest starting salary in the nation at $33,977.  “What people have to understand, is that when you get to law enforcement, you’re here to help people,” Watson said.  “If you want to help your community and you want to help solve these problems, you need to come join us.”  That’s what matters to Katryna Solley.  Solley is a former motocross racer who became a trooper four months ago.  “I wanted to do something that meant something,” she said.  There is room for advancement at the Florida Highway Patrol, and Solley has big dreams.  She wants to fight crime and capture drug kingpins.  “It’s not just getting on the road and being a road trooper the rest of your life; there’s a lot of different areas you can get into,” Solley said.  State troopers handle homicide cases, find drug traffickers, and handle cases of civil unrest, mobs and prison riots.  “I’m able to make a difference, help people, and then I’m not stuck in an office all day.  I get to get out and do things,” Solley said.  The Florida Highway Patrol will be holding a recruitment fair at the Bradenton Patrol office at 5023 53rd Ave. E.  It will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 2 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

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Trooper Timothy Pratt remembered as "hero of heroes" at funeral

 

The long gray line of the New York State Police got a lot longer and a lot more colorful Monday morning.  New York State troopers were joined by their brethren from Canada, Massachusetts and even Texas.  They were all in South Glens Falls to honor Tim Pratt, a man who was all in for South Glens Falls.  A founding member of the South High Marathon Dance, he was born and raised here.  Raised his family here. And today his funeral was held here, his sons doing the readings and his daughter adding humor to a somber ceremony.  Sarah Pratt reminding the 800 people gathered inside, including New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, how much Tim Pratt loved to laugh out loud.
  "His laugh was more like a scream.  Unique, a sound I will yearn to hear for the rest of my life," she said.  Tim Pratt died Wednesday morning after being hit by a car while helping a lost trucker.  Whether at work or in the community, Pratt lived to help others.
He was honored in 2015 by the Marathon Dance for all his years of support.  His children and granddaughter presenting him with a plaque.  "Happy to be here and make sure everybody gets home safe."  The deep-voiced Pratt is heard saying to the enthusiastic young dancers.  Time and again, people talk about a man who was there for his family, his community and the public.  "How lucky we are to have known a man who was so dedicated to helping others," said New York State Police Superintendent George Beach.  "Tim Pratt reminds us, his life and death, about all that is good and noble in the profession to protect and serve," said Bishop Emeritus Howard Hubbard, who assisted in the service.  At the end of the nearly two hour ceremony, with police officers from across the country standing at attention, Trooper Pratt was carried to the hearse and his children were helped to their father's troop car for the ride to the cemetery.  Sarah Pratt reminding them all, "And he is inside each of you in my family and his family, and will always be."

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New York State Trooper helps elderly man bury his dog

 

Trooper helps bury dog

 

A trooper from the New Lebanon barracks helped a Columbia County man retrieve and bury his dog after it was killed on State Route 22, State Police said Monday.  A 92-year-old Austerlitz man called troopers about 6 p.m. Oct. 4 to say his golden retriever had wandered away from his home and been struck by a car.  Trooper Louis E. Godfroy IV (pictured on the left with State Police Superintendent Joseph D'Amico) returned the dog's body to the man's home and realized the owner would not able to properly bury his dog.  The next day, when Godfroy was off duty, he returned to the River Road home and buried the man's beloved dog.  According to the State Police, "Godfroy helped a member of our community with compassion, courtesy and professionalism by taking the initiative to help the elderly couple with the loss of their family pet."

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New Paws are Hitting the Road in Connecticut

Connecticut K 9 graduation

 

At 10:00 a.m. Friday morning, 12 K9 handlers and their dogs graduated from the CSP K9 Academy today after 8 weeks of training.  All of the dogs are Labradors from Guiding Eyes in New York.  The handlers from State Police are all assigned to the Emergency Services Unit.  These troopers and their K9s frequently assist with sweeping venues that host significant events and also respond to bomb threats.  Two of the troopers, Tfc. Brian Faughnan (CSP) and Trooper Steve Sicard (MSP), are second time K9 handlers.  Officer Morelli retired from the State Police as a K9 handler/unit instructor and continues to use his skills with Mohegan Tribal Police Department.

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New Paws are Hitting the Road in Connecticut

Connecticut K 9 graduation

 

At 10:00 a.m. Friday morning, 12 K9 handlers and their dogs graduated from the CSP K9 Academy today after 8 weeks of training.  All of the dogs are Labradors from Guiding Eyes in New York.  The handlers from State Police are all assigned to the Emergency Services Unit.  These troopers and their K9s frequently assist with sweeping venues that host significant events and also respond to bomb threats.  Two of the troopers, Tfc. Brian Faughnan (CSP) and Trooper Steve Sicard (MSP), are second time K9 handlers.  Officer Morelli retired from the State Police as a K9 handler/unit instructor and continues to use his skills with Mohegan Tribal Police Department.

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Kentucky State Police graduates 39 new troopers

KSP Class94 grads LW18 20161028 195546

 

The Kentucky State Police Academy presented diplomas to 39 new troopers at ceremonies held in Frankfort Friday.  Their addition to the force brings the agency’s strength to a total of 911 troopers serving the citizens of the Commonwealth.  “I am pleased to welcome these 39 new troopers,” said KSP Commissioner Rick Sanders.  “It’s been a long, hard road and they have paid their dues. They have earned that patch and that badge.”  “Twenty-first century policing is a tough job,” he added. “These men and women have prepared to go out and be the best of the best as guardians of their communities.”  The new troopers are part of the agency’s 94th cadet class.  They reported for duty on May 22, 2016 in a class that consisted of 66 cadets.  Twenty-seven resigned during the rigorous 23-week training cycle that followed.  Six women started the program and four completed the training.  The training included more than 1,000 hours of classroom and field study in subjects such as constitutional law, juvenile and traffic law, use of force, weapons training, defensive tactics, first aid, high speed vehicle pursuit, criminal investigation, computer literacy, hostage negotiations, evidence collection, radio procedures, search and seizure, crash investigation, drug identification, traffic control, crowd control, armed robbery response, land navigation, electronic crimes, sex crimes, hate crimes, domestic violence, bomb threats and hazardous materials.  Several members of the class earned special recognitions including valedictorian Sarah Burgess, of Lexington, Ky., and salutatorian Joseph Kenny, of New Castle, Ky.  William Pope, of Harlan, Ky., received the Ernie Bivens Award, an honor presented to the cadet who, in the opinion of the KSP Academy staff supported by input from the cadets themselves, shows distinction as a class leader, strives for academic excellence and has excelled in all phases of the academy’s physical and vocational training.  Nicholas Brumback, of McKee, Ky., received the Commissioner’s Commitment to Excellence Award, which is presented to cadets who demonstrate leadership, the desire to get the job done and the determination to be the best every day.  Jeremey Hamilton, of Danville, Ky., received the Overall Fitness Award.  Three of the new troopers are from London. Lexington, Harlan and Stanford are each represented by two new troopers.  Each new trooper will be supervised by a training officer for six to eight weeks after reporting to their post assignments.

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2017 America's Best Looking Trooper Cruiser Calendars

The 2017 Cruiser Calendar are HERE!!!   Order yours TODAY!   $10.  Go to www.statetroopers.org to order!

 

calendar they are here

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Wisconsin Troopers presented heroism awards by Govenor

wisconsin awards

 

Four troopers with the Wisconsin State Patrol received awards in Madison Wednesday presented by Governor Scott Walker.  Two of those troopers are with the Eau Claire Post.  They received division awards for courageous actions and exemplary service.  Trooper Bill Lindeman of Chippewa Falls attended the awards ceremony where he received a certificate and a pin.  On November 18, 2015, Lindeman and Eau Claire County Sheriff's Deputy Dave Riewestahl responded to a call for a woman having a cardiac attack.  "I got there and we started doing two person CPR until the fire department arrived," said Trooper Lindeman.  Thanks to their efforts, the victim got a pulse back and started breathing before being transported to a hospital.  Trooper Lindeman received a lifesaving award for assisting with a medical emergency.  Trooper Bill Lindeman said he's honored to be recognized, and he hopes it shows people the importance of learning basic life-saving skills, such as CPR.  "That's really what saves people's lives is that basic stuff at the start if somebody's trained.  Getting that person to hang on until advanced life support gets there," said Trooper Bill Lindeman.  Trooper Steven Wojcik of Strum wasn't able to attend the ceremony, but was recognized for his valiant attempt to save the life of an Osseo man with difficulty breathing in September 2016.  While Wojcik did get a pulse back by doing CPR, the man died on the way to the hospital.  The troopers were nominated for their efforts because of their compassion and dedication in attempting to save lives and showing courage during stressful conditions.  They say they're just doing their jobs.  "Happy to do it.  I'm fortunate to have the opportunity to do something like that," said Trooper Lindeman.

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In Memory of New York State Trooper Timothy Pratt

NYSP Collage

 

Trooper Timothy Pratt was struck and killed by a vehicle while assisting a lost motorist on the 300 block of Ballard Road in Wilton, New York, at approximately 6:15 am.  He was just beginning his shift when he observed a tractor trailer parked in the center turn lane in front of the state police barracks.  After speaking to the driver and providing him directly, Trooper Pratt stepped off the cab of the truck.  As he stepped onto the roadway he was struck by an oncoming vehicle.  Trooper Pratt was transported to a local hospital before being flown to Albany Medical Center Hospital.  He succumbed to his injuries approximately three hours after being struck.  Trooper Pratt had served with the New York State Police for 29 years. He is survived by his daughter, two sons, and fiancee.

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Florida Highway Patrol holds its 134th Recruit Class ceremony

 

FHP 134th Recruit Class

Last Friday, the 134th basic recruit class of the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) graduated from the FHP Training Academy.  These 48 new troopers join the more than 1,900 troopers who patrol Florida’s roads each day to provide safety and security to residents and visitors.  “In this demanding and turbulent time, these graduates made a conscious decision to serve our state so they could help others,” said DHSMV Executive Director Terry L. Rhodes.  “I am extremely proud to welcome them to the department and grateful for their service in pursuit of a Safer Florida.”  Members of the 134th basic recruit classes went through 28 weeks of intense physical and classroom training covering topics such as human relations, law, firearms, defensive tactics, vehicle operations and first aid.  While at the FHP Training Academy, recruits also participated in several community service activities, including blood drives and volunteering to help those living with developmental disabilities.  “The men and women of the FHP have built a tradition dedicated to upholding the Patrol’s motto of ‘Courtesy, Service, Protection’ to the people of this great state,” said Colonel Gene Spaulding, Director of the Florida Highway Patrol. “This graduating class has put in countless hours of physical and mental training to prepare them for a career with FHP and I commend them for their dedication and commitment.”  Upon reporting to their duty stations, the new troopers will be placed with a certified Field Training Officer (FTO). Troopers will work in tandem with their FTO’s for up to 12 weeks prior to being released to solo duty.  The FHP is currently recruiting.  Those looking for an exciting career in law enforcement have endless possibilities within the ranks of the Patrol.  From Pensacola to the Florida Keys, FHP allows you to make a career where you call home.  Opportunities and openings are statewide.  FHP is now hiring for the 136th basic recruit class starting February 2017.  To learn more about Florida’s finest, visit www.BeATrooper.com or contact FHP’s Recruitment Office at 850-617-2307.  Get connected with the FHP Training Academy via Facebook (Florida Highway Patrol Training Academy).

To watch the graduation video, go to this link: https://www.facebook.com/FloridaHighwayPatrolTrainingAcademy/videos/1105454629551349/    

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State Police Face Staffing Shortages as Salaries Languish

NYSP Graduation salaries languish

 

Virginia’s state police expected an influx of money from the new state budget.  Instead, they learned this summer that a shortfall would quash promised raises for all state employees and doom a separate effort to give experienced officers an additional pay boost.  The week the deficit became public, 11 Virginia troopers and civilians quit.  “Many of our people have just kind of thrown their hands up and said, ‘Listen, I’ve got to do what I’ve got to do to take care of my family and if you’re not going to help me do it, then I’m going to go elsewhere,’ said Wayne Huggins, who heads the Virginia State Police Association.  It’s a problem that state police departments — which patrol highways, assist local officers, and serve as the only law enforcement in some rural areas — are facing across the country.  A combination of low pay, baby-boom retirements and recruitment troubles has left state police departments short of manpower.  Fewer troopers also puts public safety at risk because large swaths of highways go unpatrolled, and response times to crashes and other emergencies are growing longer, Huggins said.  “We perform roles that only the state police [can],” Huggins said.  Beyond salaries, continuously tight budgets across many states can take a toll on troopers’ morale.  Outdated equipment, the disappearance of fringe benefits like cellphone allowances, and the demand for overtime work in exchange for comp days that they may not even have time to take have convinced many officers to head for the exits.  And attracting replacements is increasingly difficult as recruits favor the many municipal police departments that pay more than their state counterparts.  The Virginia State Police, for instance, saw a nearly 50 percent decrease in applications between February and August, and only 31 percent of applicants actually showed up for testing.  Declining unemployment and rising police-community tensions could be partly to blame for fewer applicants, according to Nelson Lim, a sociologist who analyzes recruitment, retention, diversity and other police personnel issues for the RAND Corp., a nonprofit public policy think tank.  Even before this summer’s resignations, the Virginia State Police had gaping holes in its force.  Over the last decade, the department’s budget has been reduced by $107 million, including a $13.1 million cut this year.  The starting salary for a Virginia trooper is $36,207, which is several thousand dollars below the national average, Huggins said.  Like many other state police departments, the force also has been depleted by a flood of baby-boom retirements.  Overall, the force is short 237 sworn officers, the equivalent of 11 percent of its 2,118 troopers, special agents and supervisors. It’s also short more than a hundred civilian employees, who are responsible for tasks that include manning 911 call centers and maintaining vehicles.  The story is similar in Maine, where state police decided low salaries were to blame for their staffing vacancies.  They hope pay raises ranging from 12 to 18 percent will reverse the shortage.  In Pennsylvania, where the number of state police retirees is expected to balloon in the next few years, the department has struggled to get more money from the state because transportation advocates have previously argued that funds would be better spent on infrastructure.  In Georgia, troopers cannot get to thousands of crashes each year because of staffing shortages caused by low pay and recruitment struggles.  In Iowa, the trooper training academy hasn’t hosted a new class in two years, and state police are operating with 102 fewer officers than they had in 1998.  State Patrol spokesman Sgt. Nathan Ludwig isn’t sure how much the $50,564 starting salary has to do with those staffing shortages, but he knows that a large number of retirements are, at least in part, to blame.“We’re trying to replace the people who are retiring and it’s hard to do that,” Ludwig said.  In Washington state, retirements and resignations meant for years that more officers were leaving the force than recruits were joining it.  The issue came to a head in 2015, when 31 troopers quit, moving to other, higher-paying police agencies. Including the number of people who retired, 106 troopers left the force that year.  The resignations created almost four times as many vacancies as the previous six years — combined.  Washington State Patrol had known for years that its salaries weren’t competitive.  But a study requested by the Legislature and conducted last year found more than money was involved.  Troopers also were dissatisfied with a management culture that left them feeling disconnected out on the road, said Travis Matheson, the agency’s recruiting director.  People who work in law enforcement don’t do it for the money, Matheson said.  But it does make a difference.  Morale is affected, he said, by the fact that troopers make less money than many of their counterparts in neighboring police and sheriff’s departments.  “They would work next to their counterparts in other organizations that were a lot smaller, with a lot less prestige, with a lot less training and lot of things that didn’t compare to us, but they were making a lot more money than we were,” Matheson said.  Washington State Patrol salaries fall below that of a number of local police agencies.  For example, entry-level state troopers earn $54,192 a year — $22,509 less than their counterparts in Kennewick, who draw $76,701 in their first year of service at the southeast Washington police department.  Now, that’s changing. Troopers will get about a 30 percent raise over the next several years (funded by a $30 increase in the state vehicle license fee), starting with an increase in the starting salary to $57,783 in 2018.  The law that dictates the raises also requires the state patrol to invest in recruitment campaigns to attract people who are unlikely to show interest in joining the force, including those who live in low-income and minority neighborhoods.   Already, the department has used billboards to advertise.  And it’s experimenting with testimonials from new troopers on social media and popular apps like Pandora, an internet radio station, to encourage people to sign up.  “They’re very young,” Matheson said of the troopers featured in the ads.  “They look and sound young.  They’re a diverse representation of the agency.”  A dedicated source of funding might be the solution in other states, said Huggins, the Virginia trooper representative.  He points to legislation offered by Virginia state Sen. Charles Carrico, a Republican and former state trooper who wants to create a dedicated revenue stream to support the state police by raising vehicle registration fees by $1.25 each year through 2026.  “We don’t need a Band-Aid,” Huggins said.  “These problems have been persisting for years. They just have grown almost to a crisis point now.  We need some long-term solutions.”  The blame for the staffing problems often goes beyond money.  Police departments need to speed up their hiring process, which can sometimes take up to a year, said Jon Walters, a former police officer from Washington who founded Public Safety Testing, a company that streamlines applications so candidates can apply to more than one agency at a time.  “The reality is that in the private sector, for even highly skilled positions, they [employers] can make a decision in weeks rather than months,” Walters said.  “That’s what we’re competing against.”  Police agencies also should consider making it easier for recruits to join by easing up on the measures they use to evaluate potential officers, said Lim of the RAND Corp.  Forcing local and state recruits to take tests in which they have to decipher complicated legal terminology before they’ve even gone through training often rules out candidates who could be excellent law enforcement agents, he said.  They just haven’t learned the material yet.  And while physical tests like jumping 6-foot fences and dragging human-sized dummies around demonstrate physical ability, officers may have to do those types of things only once or twice in an entire career, Lim said.  So, the tests aren’t consistent with everyday requirements of the job.  “Most of the time, these tests are homegrown tests,” Lim said. “They are not scientifically significantly validated”.

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