CHP Officer's act of kindness helps man who lost wallet

 

CA Trooper

 

You've heard about acts of kindness among strangers, but here's one that breaks the mold.  The center divide of Interstate 80 is an unforgiving no-man's land populated by the broken down or the desperate.  Last Saturday night, John Badial of Vacaville fit the latter category. "All my money for the week, all the money we had was in the center divide," Badial said.  He's an auto mechanic and father of two who made the common mistake of leaving his wallet on the roof of the family car. "I went right over the bump and I happened to glance in my rear-view mirror and saw everything fall out of my wallet and hit the ground," Badial said.  California Highway Patrol Ofc. James Morrell doesn't often receive calls about people crawling around highway medians in the dark on their hands and knees.  "I thought he was broken down or ran out of gas, something like that," he said.  As Morrell soon learned those $200 meant everything to a man with a family living paycheck top paycheck. "Everything is accounted for. Every nickel gets spent, pretty much, so it was a huge loss for us," Badial said.  But there is more to this story because Morrell is second generation CHP and there was something about Badial's plight that touched him.  As he escorted him to a gas station, he noticed a cash machine nearby.  While Badial filled up his tank with gas, Morrell withdrew $60, walked over and gave it to him.  "Because that is how I was raised, my parents taught me to help everyone in any way that I'm able to do.  And that's again the reason why I got this job.  I wanted to help everybody," Morrell said.  "I was pretty thankful and got choked up about it because he doesn't know me from Adam, you know," Badial said.  They know each other, now.  Two strangers linked by bad luck and goodwill and an act of kindness on a busy highway.

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Maryland State Police troopers participate in 2016 Safety Fair to benefit the Maryland Food Bank.

 

Maryland Food Bank

 

Hundreds of Marylanders joined state troopers and their community partners at the JFK Highway Barrack's 2016 Safety Fair to benefit the Maryland Food Bank.  Almost 600 lbs. of food were collected while youngsters had a chance to see K-9 demonstrations, sit in Maryland State Police vehicles, and play a host of interactive games while enjoying the free Nathan's hot dogs.Line

Meet the newest member of the Georgia State Patrol

 

Georgias newest trooper

 

Meet the newest member of the Georgia State Patrol. He is going to be one tough K-9 when he grows up. #gsp #gatrooper

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Connecticut State Police on lookout for birds "jaywalking" on highways

 

Hawk in Connecticut

 

It’s been quite a week for the Connecticut State Police.  A homicide investigation, manhunts, DUI checkpoints, motor vehicle accidents.  But there is one story that put feather in troopers’ hats on social media:  A post on their Facebook page about a hawk walking on I-91 in Cromwell earlier this week.  The post on the Connecticut State Police’s Facebook page got over 1,000 shares and more than 320 comments.  Along with publishing photos of the hawk on the side of the highway, the pun-laden post took flight, triggering a flock of comments.  It read: “Troopers, Connecticut Department of Transportation service patrol and Connecticut State Environmental Conservation Police flocked to the area of I-91 north near exit 21 to provide some assistance to a hawk strolling along the shoulder.  Luckily things didn’t take a turn for the worse and we were able to take the hawk under our wing and protect it from the cars flying by.  No fowl play is suspected in this case - DEEP will be providing further assistance.”  The hawk, which did survive, was taken by Cromwell Animal Control to recover.  Days later, state police used the hawk story to get out a highway safety message. Using a photo of the hawk walking down the highway, Trooper Tyler Weerden, who is the state police’s social media specialist, created a graphic titled “Hawk’s Corner. Winging Good Information Your Way.” It answered the question:  “recently saw a hawk on the highway and couldn’t help but wonder if any laws were broken?”  After saying no laws were broken “just a few ruffled feathers,” it listed want is not allowed on the highway, like pedestrians, Segways, golf carts and “shenanigans.”  The post, again, received a number comments and likes including one from Eva MariaPuo:  “I have to say you guys are managing this page very well.  You find creative and funny ways to get message across.  Kudos to your social media rep!”  Many other people are also noticing.  In the last year, state police have greatly expanded their presence on social media with 19,962 followers on Twitter and 44,674 likes onFacebook.  And, the bird stories keep on coming.  On Saturday morning, Weerden posted on the state police Facebook page another bird walking on the side of the interstate highway.  “Not sure what's going on this week but now we have owls hanging out on the highway, 84 E X31 in Southington.  Animal control is en route. Hawk...owl...what's next?”

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High School raises money for Virginia State Police

A group of baseball moms from James River High School, along with Virginia State Police, held the first ever First Responder Festival.  It was inspired by the death of Trooper Chad Dermyer, who was killed at the Greyhound bus station in Richmond last March.  Today, former high school baseball players volunteered to play at the festival to honor our local first responders.  “It means so much not just for State Police but first responders everywhere to know that our communities are so supportive that they would come out and make this kind of effort event to show their support and appreciation for what we do,” said Wayne Huggins, executive director of Virginia State Police Association.  Money raised goes to the Virginia State Police Emergency Relief Fund.
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Michigan State Police organizing citizens policy academy

 

Michigan State Police

The Michigan State Police Jackson post is organizing a citizens police academy to familiarize residents with the department's mission, operation and local personnel. Participants will meet from 5:30 to 8 p.m. every Monday and Wednesday from Oct. 10 to Oct. 31 in a classroom at the state police post, 3401 Cooper St. Information will be presented through Power Point and demonstrations by state police employees. An Oct. 31 graduation ceremony will end the academy. The idea is to make people aware of law enforcement's role in the community and state police procedures, and to get to know Jackson troopers, according to a statement.Line

North Carolina Trooper shows off his cruiser at Chick-fil-A

 

NC Trooper at Chick fil A

Eating dinner at Chick-fil-A tonight and witnessed this State Trooper showing his vehicle and the lights and all to these little boys and this family. Very sweet to watch... I'm pretty sure he just became their hero.

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Rhode Island State Police seized up to 2 million in drugs during search warrent

 

Rhode Island Drug Arrest

 

The Rhode Island State Police arrested a Providence man on Sunday after obtaining a warrant to search his home and finding what they estimated to be up to $2 million in narcotics.  The police charged Raul Ramirez, 32, of 185 Pavilion St., 2nd floor, on multiple drug and weapons charges after seizing 22.5 kilograms of cocaine, 1 kilogram of heroin, a Glock handgun and drug paraphernalia.  Ramirez was held without bail and scheduled to be arraigned on Tuesday in District Court, Providence.  The drug raid was conducted by the Rhode Island State Police High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Task Force, which combines the efforts of the State Police and several municipal police departments along with federal agent with the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

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Video aimed at distracted drivers goes viral

 

Viral Video on distracted driving

A viral video trending on social media has millions of people realizing the horrific consequences of distracted driving just as local law enforcement agencies work to reduce distracted driving on Northern Nevada roads.  Most people have been guilty of glancing down at their phones to check a text message or change a song including the people who are in a video that has now been viewed on Facebook over 6.4 million times in just under a week.  It tells the tragic story of a woman who experienced the unthinkable because of a distracted driver.   "An 18 wheeler swerved and hit my family's car.  The resulting collision killed both of my parents.  I spent two months in the hospital fighting for my own life,” said Jacy Good.  She was permanently injured in a crash because of a distracted driver in Pennsylvania in 2008.   The video is part of a YouTube reality show series sponsored by AT&T and their "It Can Wait" campaign.  It's primarily aimed at young drivers who according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration report the highest level of phone involvement in-crash or near-crash incidences.   The Washoe County Sheriff's Office recently focused on distracted driver violations over a three week period and issued just under 200 cell phone citations during that time.  This being indicative that distracted driving is an issue in Northern Nevada.  "It only takes a moment and I mean only a brief moment of distraction to lead to a tragedy," said Bob Harmon, Public Information Officer for the Washoe County Sheriff's Office.  AAA recommends drivers put their cell phone inside a compartment and on silent mode to lessen temptation to reach for it. 

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Florida Highway Patrol trooper receives hug from young boy

 

FHP Trooper and little boy

This little man approached a Trooper this weekend to give him a hug and thank him for being his superhero. Trooper Burnette, who carries extra stuffed animals for children who are looking for comfort in times of need, was greatly moved by the gesture, and let him pick his favorite.  Before parting ways, Trooper Burnette made sure his little buddy knew he will always be his hero. #Troopersareheroes #FHP

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Florida Highway Patrol Troopers patrolling Labor Day weekend

 

 

FHP Cruisers

"We kept a close eye on anything to do with driving under the influence," said Sargent Eddie Elmore. He says he and his colleagues usually spend Labor Day weekend patrolling the highways to keep drivers safe. "Hurricane Hermine was coming into our district so we kind of changed focus for a couple days preparing for the hurricane to come in," said Sgt. Elmore. Despite Hermine many drivers still made their way to and from the beach - some of them impaired. "We've had several cases of driving under the influence over the weekend," explained Sgt. Elmore. Florida Highway Patrol has yet to tabulate just how many drivers were charged over the weekend, but they say it’s an unfortunate trend they see every year on busy roadways. "State Road A, which is I10, U.S. 231 which are all big major thoroughfares," said Sgt. Elmore, "you're gonna have those increase in fatality rates because there's just more people on the roads coming through this county." Sgt. Elmore says deputies want people to have a good time on holiday weekends, but also want them to be responsible. "If you're gonna drink," said Sgt. Elmore, "please just make sure you have a designated driver so that you don't become one of those statistics that we see every year."

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Pennsylvania State Police Help Heart Attack

PA Heart Attacj

Troopers at Diner Help Heart Attack Victim. On May 30, at approximately 4:49 a.m., personnel from PSP Lancaster were at Lyndon Diner in Manheim Township. While at the diner, the cook, Luis Flores, suffered a heart attack and collapsed on the floor. The troopers rushed to provide first aid to Flores. Trooper First Class Fassnacht, Trooper Carpenter, Trooper Trunfio, and Trooper Schianvoni performed CPR until an AED from the patrol vehicle was brought to the scene. The AED was used and applied three separate shocks to Flores. Susquehanna Valley EMS Captain Marden arrived on scene and administered one additional shock. Mr. Flores was then transported to Lancaster General Hospital for treatment. Major Orlandi, Area IV Commander, Captain Tomlinson, Troop J Commander, the American Heart Association, and Susquehanna Valley EMS Captain Marden presented certificates of appreciation to all troopers involved on Aug. 30 at PSP Lancaster.

L-R: Captain Worth of Susquehanna Valley EMS , Trooper Carpenter, Trooper Trunfio, Luis Flores, Trooper Schiavoni, Trooper First Class Fassnacht and Captain Marden of Susquehanna Valley EMS.

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Massachusetts State Police wives aim to cover the state in blue ribbons

Blue Ribbon Massachusetts

Being married to a state trooper can bring a roller coaster of emotions, local resident Barbara Johnson knows.  Mrs. Johnson couldn’t be prouder of her husband, state police Capt. Robert A. Johnson, who is stationed at the Holden barracks.  But she said he’s been punched, shot at, almost stabbed as well as hit by a car and dragged down Route 146 against traffic.  “Yet he continues to put on his uniform and could not imagine not showing up,” she wrote in an email.  Mrs. Johnson and other wives of law enforcement officers are trying to spread a show of support for their spouses with events across the state to tie blue ribbons in prominent locations.  They were in Northbridge Monday night, with about 75 Pop Warner football players and cheerleaders to do the hands-on work, to cover the town in blue.  Recent attention to shootings and other tragedies involving law enforcement officers across the country was part of the catalyst for the movement to show support.  “Media runs with the negatives,” Mrs. Johnson said.  “The wives wanted to put out a positive message because that is more widespread than the negative you see.”  Mrs. Johnson said she and other members of a Facebook group called MSP Wives wanted to let law enforcement officers know “they’re appreciated, respected and they have the community standing behind them.”  She said, “Our hope is that as officers drive through town and see the ribbons, they’re reminded of the community support.”  The MSP Wives’ Cover Our State in Blue Ribbons campaign is among some 26 states where the effort has gone viral.  The MSP Wives group was started by Kimberly Watson of Townsend, whose husband is a state police captain in Framingham and a former local police officer in Townsend.  She could not attend the event but spoke to a reporter by telephone afterward.  Mrs. Watson said the group began in March, after Trooper Thomas L. Clardy, 44, of Hudson, died after his unmarked cruiser was struck in the breakdown lane of the Massachusetts Turnpike in Charlton by a car driven by David Njuguna, 30, of Webster, while Trooper Clardy was conducting a traffic stop.  “Everybody had this horrible feeling when the phone rang every day,” she said.  The wives group, which includes at least one husband, was formed to support Trooper Clardy’s family as well as each other.  With 158 new state troopers recently graduating from the academy, Mrs. Watson said there was a whole new group of spouses to take under their wing.  “A lot of these wives had no clue what they’re walking into,” she said.  “It’s not a normal lifestyle.”  Mrs. Watson learned about a blue-ribbon effort in New York City and she jumped on board to cover all of Massachusetts’ 351 cities and towns in blue.  The wives contribute and make the materials themselves, raising money from selling homemade blue-on-black ribbons with blue roses to wear or keep.  She said her group asks first to work on the blue ribbons with local police because “we’re all one big family.”  “They were really, really supportive,” Mrs. Johnson said of the Northbridge selectmen’s reaction to the proposal for blue ribbons.  “They were kind of dumbstruck.  They didn’t know why it was not more widespread.”  According to Mrs. Johnson, a few towns have turned down the MSP Wives’ request to tie blue ribbons around various public sites.  At 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, the MSP Wives will be at the Auburn Police Department; on Wednesday they’ll be in South Deerfield; at 11 a.m. on Sunday they’ll be at the Sterling Police Department; and at 6 p.m. Sept. 7 they’ll be at the Ashburnham Police Department. Shaunna Wildman of Northbridge, whose husband Gregg Wildman is an Auburn police sergeant, was among those helping the young football players tie blue ribbons at Memorial Town Hall, along the bridge over the Mumford River and at the nonprofit human service agency Alternatives Inc.  Sgt. Wildman and Framingham Police Chief Kenneth Ferguson, also a Northbridge resident, coach 10-, 11- and 12-year-olds on the Pop Warner Blackstone Valley Patriots.  Mrs. Wildman said her husband worked with Auburn Police Officer Ronald Tarentino Jr., 42, who died in May after being shot by Jorge A. Zambrano during a traffic stop.  “He worked with Ronnie, so this is really special,” she said.  “I didn’t understand what the state police do when there’s a tragedy.  They were right there.”  Pop Warner President Kate Tracy said the coaches called off practice Monday so the players and cheerleaders could help tie the ribbons around town.  “I thought what a wonderful way to give back,” Ms. Tracy said.  “They need to understand what’s going on in our world.”  Twelve-year-old Josh Malkasian was among those climbing up pillars and fences to deck the town in blue.  “We’re trying to show our respect for the police,” he said.  In addition to decorating the town, the MSP Wives and their helpers distributed to local police what Mrs. Johnson called survival kits filled with candies.  Attached to each brown paper bag was a list of what law enforcement officers need to get through a day:

“Lifesaver – Because of how many times you’ve been one; Starburst – For that burst of energy you need; Kisses – To show our love for you; Gum – To help everyone stick together; Tootsie Roll – To help you roll with the punches; Peppermint Patty – To help you keep your cool; DumDum – Because you deal with a lot of them; Pay Day – Because you’re not doing it for the money; Snickers – To help you keep your sense of humor; Mounds – for the mounds of courage you show.”

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Iowa mom recounts state trooper changing her tire

 

Changing Tire

When Regina Majerus found herself stuck on Interstate 80 with a flat tire last week, she didn't know what to do.  She called her insurance company, which asked her to wait for a tow-truck to drive from Carlisle, more than 30 miles away from where she had been driving from her Mingo home to Newton.  Her 19-month-old son became impatient while waiting in the backseat, and she started crying, with cars speeding by her on the side of the road.  "I was frightened, scared, worried," Majerus said.  Then a state trooper stopped and offered to help her change her tire, bringing her a sense of relief.  Majerus, 22, later shared the story on Facebook, garnering attention from hundreds of other Iowans, many of whom commented on the post to share similar experiences.  "I did not expect this," she said of all of the attention the Facebook post has received.  She shared her story online not only to thank the state trooper, but also to show an example of kindness, she said.  "I just wanted to show some positivity," she said in a phone interview.  Iowa State Patrol spokesman Sgt. Nathan Ludwig said state troopers change tires for people across Iowa probably once or twice a day.  "Changing tires is nothing new to the State Patrol," he said.  "We're not looking to get praised for this."  But Ludwig added that support from Majerus and others who shared her story online is appreciated.  Majerus said she's also grateful to Barney's in Newton, which quickly sent a tow truck out to help, free of charge.  The trooper started changing the tire and a tow truck from Barney's showed up to help finish the job.  And she was especially grateful that the state trooper noticed her young son was upset, she said.  "I will always be thankful for that," she said.

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Tennessee State Troopers find 100 pounds of marijuana inside motorhome

 

Tennessee Drug Stop Motorhome

 

The driver of a motorhome was arrested after the Tennessee Highway Patrol says they found 100 pounds of marijuana inside his vehicle.  The traffic stop happened on Interstate 24 East in Marion County as the driver, identified as 40-year-old Lester Beltran, was heading to Miami, Florida.  According to the THP, a trooper conducted the traffic stop and “observed several indicators that indicated possible criminal activity.”  More troopers were called to the scene to assist, and K-9 was deployed inside the motorhome.  When questioned, Beltran allegedly said several empty duffel bags and moving boxes were full of household goods because he was moving.  According to a press release, a trooper asked him to open a box and confirm the contents.  At that time, Beltran reportedly stated, “It’s marijuana.”  Troopers say they then found six cardboard boxes with 83 vacuum-sealed bags of high-grade marijuana totaling 100 pounds.  The vehicle was seized and the suspect was arrested without incident.  An investigation revealed Beltran was traveling from Colorado, where he stated he obtained the marijuana to take back to Miami, Florida.  The motor home was registered to Beltran’s wife’s company out of Montana.  “States like Tennessee, where marijuana is not legal, are beginning to see more of the drug which may have been grown legally in another state and then trafficked in to states like ours,” said Tennessee Highway Patrol Colonel Tracy Trott.

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