Nebraska State Patrol troopers seize 117 pounds of cocaine, suspected fentanyl during traffic stop

NSP Drug Seizure

Troopers with the Nebraska State Patrol have seized 117 pounds of narcotics during a traffic stop on Interstate 80 near Kearney. The traffic stop occurred at approximately 10:20 a.m. on Thursday, April 26, when a trooper observed an eastbound 2013 Freightliner truck-tractor and semi-trailer driving on the shoulder near mile marker 280, according to a press release from the Nebraska State Patrol. During the stop, the trooper became suspicious of criminal activity. Troopers searched the vehicle and discovered a false compartment located in the empty trailer. Hidden in the compartment were 42 foil-wrapped packages containing 73 pounds of cocaine and 44 pounds of an unknown powder suspected to be fentanyl. The two narcotics carry an estimated street value of $5 million-$10 million. Because of the dangerous nature of the substance, troopers do not perform field testing on suspected fentanyl. Testing at the Nebraska State Patrol Crime Lab is being utilized for confirmation, the NSP said.

5/3/18

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North Carolina Highway Patrol Unveils Glow-in-the-Dark 'Ghost Cruiser'

NCSHP Ghost Cruiser

The North Carolina State Highway Patrol has debuted a new "ghost cruiser" on its social media pages. The cruiser features markings that are more discreet and glow at night. Vance County trooper J. A. Thomas was awarded the first ghost vehicle for leading the state in DWI enforcement and arrests, the NCSHP said. "I love it. It's a nice ride," Thomas said. "Just knowing, like, this car is a reward, and if I save one life it's a greater reward." The NCSHP said it plans to deploy one of the ghost cruisers in each of its eight troops. 'A ghost patrol car has the exact same markings of our traditional marked patrol car but they just have a low profile and they glow in the dark at night," said Colonel G.M. McNeill Jr.

5/1/18

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Michigan State Police say truck-wall sends message of hope: 'There is help'

The truck drivers and Michigan State Police troopers who created a wall of trucks under a freeway overpass, preventing a person from jumping, are being hailed as heroes. Renee Osaer, safety director for Moon Star, said she was proud that one of the company's drivers was involved.  "At Moon Star (Express) we believe in safety and giving people chances," Osaer said. "We were very pleased to be able to assist in the situation because we feel that all of our drivers and everyone out there are people, and that's ultimately the goal — safety and people." At about 1 a.m. Tuesday, a truck wall was assembled under the Coolidge overpass on I-696 to prevent a man from taking his life. There were 13 trucks total, lined up on both the eastbound and westbound sides of the freeway, with the man standing above them. Because of the efforts of the Michigan State Police and the truckers, the man walked safely off the overpass. The situation lasted about two hours. Michigan State Police directed the trucks as they approached the overpass, First Lt. Michael Shaw said. "Basically, what we do, as we're shutting the freeway down, we'll go through and we'll kind of 'volun-told' some truck drivers as they come along and we'll line them up underneath there," Shaw said. "The thought process of that is, if the individual involved decides to jump off of the overpass or loses his grip and falls, he's only falling 5 feet or 6 feet onto the top of these semi-trailers." Shaw said the practice has been used for more than 20 years, but it has never taken up an entire freeway. It has also never apparently been captured on camera and shared widely on social media.  Shaw said these situations usually resolve themselves in 10 to 15 minutes. As praise has poured in for the police and the drivers, Shaw said it's important to focus on what sparked their actions.  "One of the things that we really wanted to talk about with this particular photo, as we saw it kind of circulating around is, we know our troopers did a great job out there and we're grateful for the truck drivers but also in that photo is a man standing on the overpass, thinking about taking his own life," Shaw said. "For law enforcement, we take that very seriously." Shaw also stressed that people who are considering suicide should know there is help available.  "We want to make sure to kind of use this photo as well to tell people that there is help out there," Shaw said.  "Be it the suicide hotline, be it 911, the clergy, a family member. Before you take that final step, reach out to people and talk to them about maybe some help you can get."

4/30/17

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North Carolina Highway Patrol writes nearly 13,000 traffic violations during campaign

NCHP Operation to Drive to live

The NC Highway Patrol spent a week conducting “Operation Drive to Live,” a campaign to reduce teen-related crashes during prom season. The operation began Monday, April 16 and focused on education and enforcement. Troopers conducted more than 153 traffic safety presentations and patrolled nearly 560 school zones, monitoring driving behaviors of teens as they traveled to and from school. The NC Highway Patrol says across the nation, motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of death of teens each year. “Simply talking to teenagers about the perils of driving recklessly is the first step”, said First Sergeant Michael Baker, SHP spokesperson. “Working together, we can reduce the number of teenage collisions one conversation at a time. Although the campaign has ended, troopers will continue to monitor teenage drivers throughout the year. Here’s a look at some of the totals in our area, which includes 10 counties in Southeastern NC:

  • 53 DWI charges
  • 5 DWI under 21 charges
  • 795 Speeding tickets
  • 248 Seat belt tickets
  • 2 Felony drug violations

Across the state, a total of 12,801 traffic and criminal violations were found during this campaign.

4/27/18

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Virginia State Police dedicates helipad to honor trooper-pilot killed in line of duty in 2017

VSP helipad dedication

helipad

Two Virginia governors joined more than 200 family and friends Wednesday, April 18, to formally dedicate and name the helipad at the Virginia State Police administrative headquarters in Chesterfield County.  Governor Ralph Northam and former Governor Terry McAuliffe, along with Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security Brian Moran and the family of Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates unveiled the new sign that designates the helipad in Bates’ memory.  “The Trooper-Pilot Berke Bates Helipad will serve as a lasting tribute to Berke’s incredible spirit and legacy as a public safety professional, aviator, father, son, brother, and friend,” said Col. Gary T. Settle, Virginia State Police superintendent.  “This memorial will be seen by those visiting our administrative headquarters and academy.  It is also rightly located just across the way from the very academy doors Berke proudly walked through in January 2004 to begin his career as a Virginia State Police trooper.  We hope this simple, but meaningful, tribute brings added and lasting comfort to his family, friends, and colleagues.”  Bates, 40, and the State Police Aviation Unit Commander, Lt. H. Jay Cullen III, became the Department’s 64th and 65th Virginia State Police line of duty deaths when their helicopter crashed Aug. 12, 2017, in Albemarle County.  The Department dedicated its Chesterfield Aviation Base and Headquarters in Lt. Cullen’s memory in February 2018.  Trooper-Pilot Bates was born in Manassas, Va., and graduated from Brentsville District Middle-Senior High School in Nokesville, Va., in 1994.  He served as a trooper with the Florida Highway Patrol from 1998 until he joined the Virginia State Police in 2004.  He graduated from the Virginia State Police Academy on August 27, 2004, as a member of the 107th Basic Session.  His first assignment was in Virginia State Police Richmond Division’s Area 8 Office, which encompasses the City of Richmond and Henrico County. Less than a year later he became a member of the office’s Motors Unit, serving as a motorcycle trooper until 2013.  He joined the Governor’s protection detail, known as the State Police Executive Protective Unit, in October 2013 and served with the unit for three years before accepting promotion to Special Agent with the Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation’s Richmond Field Office General Investigations Section.  In July 2017, he became a Trooper-Pilot with the Virginia State Police Aviation Unit.  Bates is survived by his wife, twin 12-year-old son and daughter, parents, and siblings.

4/25/18

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California Highway Patrol graduates 82 new officers

CHP April 2018 Graduation

On Friday the California Highway Patrol held its cadet graduation at the CHP Academy in West Sacramento. CHP Commissioner Warren Stanley and California State Transportation Agency Secretary Brian Annis were on hand for the morning ceremony, during which 82 new officers were sworn in. Throughout 28 weeks of training, these men and women have been preparing to provide the highest level of safety, service, and security. Following Friday’s graduation ceremony, the new officers will serve in communities throughout the state. CHP spokeswoman Jaime Coffee said that of those new officers four are assigned within Northern Division, the jurisdiction that includes Lake County. Of those four, three will report to the Humboldt Area and one is being assigned to Ukiah Area, which is the office next to the Clear Lake Area office, which is located in Kelseyville.

4/23/18

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Nebraska State Patrol confiscates $5 million worth of pot

NSP 5 million marijuana bust

Nebraska state troopers said Thursday that they had seized more than 1,850 pounds of marijuana worth an estimated $5 million.  About 6 p.m. Wednesday near Geneva, a trooper stopped a 2017 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter van that was driving on the shoulder of U.S. Highway 81, a Nebraska State Patrol spokesman said.  During the traffic stop, a patrol K9 alerted troopers to the possible presence of a controlled substance inside the van.  Troopers searched the van.  The patrol spokesman said they found 1,853 pounds of marijuana, 8,779 doses of hash oil for vape pens and 46 pounds of loose hash wax.  The driver, a 39-year-old man from Arvada, Colorado, was arrested on suspicion of possession of more than 1 pound of marijuana, possession with intent to deliver and having no drug tax stamp.

4/23/18

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Utah Highway Patrol stops pickup truck hauling more than 300 pounds of marijuana bound for Minnesota

UHP Marijuana

Utah Highway Patrol troopers on Monday seized more than 300 pounds of marijuana on Interstate 80, the state Department of Public Safety (DPS) said. About 7:30 a.m. Monday, a UHP trooper stopped a pickup truck on I-80 at milepost 158 — several miles south of Coalville — for making an improper lane change, according to a DPS news release. After speaking to the driver, the trooper became suspicious of criminal activity. In his conversation with the driver, the trooper was made aware the pickup truck was a rental from a third party, the news release said. The trooper deployed his K-9, which gave a positive indication of a drug odor coming from the vehicle. The trooper then found 356 pounds of marijuana in the bed of the truck. According to State Bureau of Investigation agents (SBI), who are conducting the investigation, the marijuana originated in Northern California and was headed to Minnesota, the news release said.  SBI agents estimate each pound of the drug would have sold for $2,500, for a total of about $890,000 for all 356 pounds. The investigation is still active. No further information is available.

4/20/18

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Pair of baby black bears saved by Virginia State Trooper 'just doing his job'

VSP Baby Bears

These little cubs may not be paying taxes, but they sure do owe Virginia State a whole lot after a trooper saved their lives. The two black bear cubs were rescued by senior trooper DH Cepelnik after their mother was struck and killed by a vehicle. The department posted a photo of the trooper with the cubs writing that he was just doing his job when he rescued them. The pair is now residing at the Wildlife Center of Virginia where they’re receiving lots of love and attention.

4/20/18

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Governor LePage nominates new Maine State Police Chief

Maine State Police Chief nominee

Gov. Paul LePage has nominated Lt. Col. John Cote to take over the top spot at the Maine State Police. Cote, who has been the deputy chief for the last two years, would succeed Col. Robert Williams, who retired in February to take over security at Colby College in Waterville. “I am pleased to nominate Lt. Col. Cote,” LePage said in a statement Friday. “He is an experienced law enforcement professional who will help us continue to provide the highest level of service to the people of Maine. He understands the needs of the agency as we work to recruit more troopers and fight the opioid epidemic.” Cote has been with Maine State Police for 29 years. Prior to serving as deputy chief under Williams, he commanded the state police’s Troop F in Houlton. He has an associate degree in criminal justice/legal technology from the University of Maine and has completed numerous law enforcement professional development courses, including a 10-week program at the FBI National Academy in Quantico, Virginia, last year. His nomination will be heard by the Legislature’s Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee and would then go to the Maine Senate for confirmation. LePage announced his nomination on the same day he spoke at a graduation ceremony for five new troopers at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy in Vassalboro.

4/18/18

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South Dakota Highway Patrol trooper does push-ups in blizzard to honor fallen officers

 

Doing push-ups on their own can be difficult. Doing them in a blizzard, in uniform? Now that's impressive. To honor those law enforcement officers who have lost their lives in 2018, a Trooper with the South Dakota Highway Patrol did 39 push-ups to honor each life lost. The unnamed Trooper did all of the push-ups during an April blizzard sweeping through South Dakota.

4/17/18

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New Colonel of Tennessee Highway Patrol named

THP New Colonel

The first African-American has been named as the top leader of the Tennessee Highway Patrol, a veteran of the agency who was responsible for its daily operations for the past seven years. Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Safety and Homeland Security Commissioner David W. Purkey announced Lt. Col. Dereck Stewart as colonel Wednesday, The Tennessean reported. Stewart will take over as new colonel of the agency June 1. Col. Tracy Trott will retire after 40 years of service on May 31. “It’s always worth it to notice when history gets made,” Haslam said at a Nashville ceremony noting Stewart becoming the first African-American in the position. “We promoted him because he is the best, most qualified, (and) has the right track record.” Haslam said it had been an honor to work with Trott. Under Trott’s leadership, the highway patrol has grown to a force of more than 900 troopers and has been the recipient of several national awards, according to a Facebook post from the agency. Purkey noted that Tennessee has experienced the lowest traffic fatality rates since 1963 during Trott’s tenure.Top of Form Stewart, who was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 2011 after serving in various agency roles, called Trott a friend and mentor. Stewart is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, the FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development Association and the Northwestern University School of Police Staff and Command. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Middle Tennessee State University.

4/16/18

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Low Price Locator

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https://lowpricelocator.com/aast

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South Dakota Highway Patrol graduates 12 recruits

SDHP Patrol Cruiser

Twelve new recruits officially join South Dakota’s Highway Patrol at a graduation ceremony Friday, April 13, in the State Capitol Rotunda in Pierre. Class 60 consists of nine men andthree women.  Graduation was the culmination of a one-year period which started with the recruits making the initial application to the Highway Patrol. After being selected, the recruits completed eight months of training which included basic law enforcement training, attending the South Dakota Highway Patrol Recruit Academy and finally, field training. “We always tell our recruits that it is not easy to become a Highway Patrol trooper, but we want them ready for any situation they might face,” says Col. Craig Price, superintendent of the South Dakota Highway Patrol. “Graduation is a major achievement for the recruits and their families. We are proud to share the moment with them.” “These recruits bring their own backgrounds, life experiences and skills to the Highway Patrol,” says Col. Price. “Each of them will help make the Patrol stronger and better able to meet the needs of the public.” Gov. Dennis Daugaard was the guest speaker for the ceremony. At the end of graduation, the new troopers received their patrol cars which were parked behind the state Capitol. Many of the graduates are scheduled to be on duty as early as Saturday, April 14.

4/10/18

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Maryland State Police gets its first female barrack commander

MSP Female Commander

The first female commander of the Maryland State Police’s Westminster Barrack doesn’t see the barrier-breaking achievement to be of particular significance — but she understands that, to others, it’s a big deal. “As far as significance, it is not significant to me,” Lt. Rebecca Bosley wrote in an email. “However, I do understand that it may be significant for other people, and it is important to have role models, so I understand that it is important to show a younger generation that having a leadership position and being female is possible.” Sheriff Jim DeWees, who previously held the commander position during his career with MSP, said Bosley has the skills needed to gain the respect of those she leads, and that’s more significant than her gender. “It doesn’t matter whether you’re a male or female as long as you can lead troopers,” he said. Bosley said she anticipates that leadership training and communication skills will be crucial in her new role. “Speaking with the community and providing people information is imperative. Transparency and fairness is critical for community involvement,” she wrote in an email. Bosley took command on Feb. 14, succeeding Lt. Patrick McCrory, who had been in place since 2013. She has moved around quite a bit during her career with MSP, but she keeps returning to Westminster, which was her first assignment after graduating from the police academy. She was in Carroll until 2008, when she was promoted and transferred to Frederick. She returned to Westminster as a corporal and was named Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year for the barrack in 2010. But then she was on the move again, promoted to sergeant and transferred to Howard County, where she was the NCO of the year for the Waterloo Barrack in 2012. She was then selected to command the newly developed DUI enforcement team known as State Police Impaired Driving Effort (SPIDRE) and commanded that unit until she was promoted to first sergeant and transferred to the Rockville Barrack. Bosley was promoted to lieutenant in January 2017 and took command of the Motor Vehicle Division. Then, in February, she was sent back to where she began, as commander of the Westminster Barrack. “Lt. Bosley has an outstanding work ethic, upholds and demands a high standard of integrity, is extremely reliable and she wants to ensure the Westminster Barrack provides the best law enforcement service in Carroll County,” said Capt. Shawn Ward, commander of the Central Troop of MSP via email. DeWees said having Bosley in the command position has further enhanced the relationship between their two agencies. Bosley attends weekly meetings with the command staff of the Sheriff’s Office, allowing the agencies to “gather our resources and fight the same issues,” DeWees said. Bosley is familiar with much of his command staff. He added that on top of having strong ties to Carroll, “They couldn’t have found a more competent person.” When asked what people may not know about the life of a law enforcement officer, Bosley said, “What I would like people to understand is we are doing a job and it is not personal.” Law enforcement officers typically see people at their worst, she said, and that limited interaction isn’t sufficient to make a judgment. “We are normal, everyday people who just want to make a difference for the better,” she said.

4/9/18

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