North Carolina troopers receive lifesaving trauma kits

 

 

The North Carolina Highway Patrol and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have teamed up in the hope of preventing deaths due to blood loss. “Any time we have an active shooting situation, which seems to be occurring every day across the U.S., we go to the fight as they say,” said Lt. Jeff Gordon of the North Carolina State Highway Patrol.  Troopers are often the first responders to scenes involving traumatic injury, such as gunshot or stab wounds. Of the 1,400 or so troopers in North Carolina, about 100 of them are certified EMTs. However, they are often without the equipment needed to help trauma victims.  Doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center recognized the issue, and began designing Individual Patrol Officer Kits, or IPOKs, with troopers in mind, even before the shooting incidents in Orlando and Dallas.  “However, with those events happening, it gave us more credence and pushed us to make certain to be able to pull this project off,” said Physician Assistant Jeff Hinshaw of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.  The IPOKs contain a tourniquet, gloves, emergency trauma dressing, gauze and a vent compact chest seal.  “These particular devices, the tourniquets, the chest seals and the gauze can make a huge difference when it comes to saving somebody’s life,” Hinshaw said.  “The very first patient that I took care of who died from injuries died from the lack of a device like this,” added Dr. Wayne Meredith, also of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.  Two-hundred of the kits will be distributed amongst the troopers. One-hundred of the kits will be given to the troopers who are EMS trained, with the remainder to be used as replacements.  Not only will the kits be used on civilians, but also the troopers themselves should they be injured.  Troopers say that one law enforcement officer is killed every 61 hours in the United States. They added that two-thirds of the officers who die in the line of duty lose their lives due to a loss of blood.

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