Missouri State Highway Patrol troopers to carry Narcan

Missouri carry Narcan

The Missouri State Highway Patrol and other state law enforcement officers are being trained on how to use an opioid overdose reversal medication.  Several troopers, park rangers and conservation agents gathered at MSHP General Headquarters on Aug. 30 for training on how to use Naloxone, also known as Narcan.  Every trooper will carry this medication after they complete training on it.  “The purpose is to fight opioid overdose and save lives,” said Trooper Nicholas Greiner with MSHP Troop H.  Greiner who has been a trooper for ten years and said he never imagined that someday he would have to carry something like Narcan.  Patrol superintendent Colonel Sandra Karsten directed the Patrol to prepare to carry and be able to use Narcan.  The drug has been stored in ambulances for several years, but Patrol will carry Narcan as a means to bridge the gap from when they arrive until a paramedic does.  The medication can be administered in a couple different ways but troopers are being trained on the nasal spray version, which works in 2-5 minutes on average.  According to MSHP, this is all a part of the Missouri Hope Project, which was conducted by Missouri’s Department of Mental Health.  The project’s goal is “to reduce opioid overdose deaths in Missouri through expanded access to prevention, public awareness, assessment, referral to treatment, overdose education and naloxone for those at risk of experiencing or witnessing an overdose event.”  “The project is a response to a nationwide opioid epidemic,” said Greiner.  The troopers are trained on how to use the medication, as well as what symptoms to look for.  Symptoms include slow breathing, discolored lips and nails, cold and clammy skin and tiny pinpoint pupils.  Greiner said he was taught to use CPR first if the subject does not have a pulse.  The patrol said Narcan spray is easy to administer and highly effective.  On Saturday, a Troop D officer, who had been recently trained, used Narcan on a motorist who had overdosed. It saved the motorist’s life.  According to MSHP, in 2016 there were more than 900 deaths in the state that resulted from heroin overdoses.

9/22/17

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