Maryland State Police welcome new cadaver dog

Maryland SP K 9

The Maryland State Police K-9 Unit has welcomed its first human remains detection dog in two decades to their ranks.  Skye, a 3-year old springer spaniel, is currently one of only three law enforcement human remains detection dogs in Maryland, according to a news release from the Maryland State Police.  She officially began work on Sept. 13 and will be made available to allied Maryland police agencies that may require the services of a cadaver dog.  Ron Snyder, public information officer for the MSP Office of Media Communications, said a cadaver dog is brought in when police are searching for a person that is believed to be deceased.  “Cadaver dogs are trained differently from search and rescue dogs, which are utilized to find living humans and not detect decomposing flesh,” he said.  Skye’s handler is Sgt. Rick Kelly, a 15-year veteran of the K-9 Unit based out of Barrack A Waterloo in Jessup, and she is assigned to the Special Operations Command.  According to the release, Skye was donated to the MSP on June 24 and underwent training leading up to her official start this month.  Two handlers from the FBI Evidence Response Team Unit, Forensic K9 Consulting — Wynn Warren and Jay Topoleski — trained Skye in the detection of human remains and they were also involved with her MSP training, according to the release.  The MSP K-9 Unit has been in operation since 1961, with K-9’s assisting in drug detection, search and rescue, explosive detection and criminal apprehension.  Currently the MSP employs 32 handlers and 41 K-9’s throughout the state, according to the release.

9/26/17

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