Florida Highway Patrol Sergeant Killed in Line of Duty

FHP Sergeant Bishop Killed In Line of Duty

Sergeant William Bishop was struck and killed by a vehicle while investigating an accident on I-75, near mile marker 403, in Alachua County.  He was outside of his vehicle when a secondary accident occurred in the center lane at approximately 10:00 pm.  One of the vehicles involved in the secondary accident then struck Sergeant Bishop, pinning him underneath it.  Sergeant Bishop had served with the Florida Highway Patrol for 30 years.  He is survived by his wife and son.

6/19/17

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Ohio State Patrol's 2016 Trooper of the Year

OHP 2016 Trooper of the Year

State Sen. Gayle Manning, a North Ridgeville Republican, honored Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper Juan “Ray” Santiago of the Elyria Post during a recent visit to Columbus, according to a June 15 news release from her office.  Santiago was named the 2016 Ohio State Highway Patrol Trooper of the Year, according to the release.  “I am pleased to honor Trooper Santiago for his commitment to our community and the state of Ohio,” Manning said.  “Ohians should take comfort in knowing that Ohio’s Highway Patrol has some of the best-trained and most dedicated public servants in the country.  “Thank you to Trooper Santiago and those who join him in an effort to keep our Ohio families safe.”  A resident of Lorain, Santiago joined the Highway Patrol in 2010, and was honored along with nine other District Troopers across the state, the release said.  Santiago’s wife, Mallory, joined him when he was honored by Manning.

6/19/17

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Florida Highway Patrol Sergeant Killed in Line of Duty

FHP Sergeant Bishop Killed In Line of Duty

 

Sergeant William Bishop was struck and killed by a vehicle while investigating an accident on I-75, near mile marker 403, in Alachua County.  He was outside of his vehicle when a secondary accident occurred in the center lane at approximately 10:00 pm.  One of the vehicles involved in the secondary accident then struck Sergeant Bishop, pinning him underneath it.  Sergeant Bishop had served with the Florida Highway Patrol for 30 years.  He is survived by his wife and son.

6/19/17

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South Carolina Highway Patrol graduates 39 new troopers

SCHP 101st Graduation

The South Carolina Highway Patrol held graduation ceremonies for 39 troopers from its High Basic class 101 Wednesday.  South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson spoke to the graduates on behalf of Gov. McMaster and read a letter to the graduates from the governor.  "Leadership is not about the perks and privileges that come with it.  It is about service," Wilson told the graduates.  Basic 101 brings the total number of troopers in South Carolina to 798.  The SCHP Basic Training Program consists of 21 weeks of extensive law enforcement training in-residence.  After graduation troopers must complete a minimum of 400 hours in the field training.  "Your job is important because you do something that few people can't even imagine," said SCDPS Director Leroy Smith.  Troopers are assigned to areas based upon population, calls for service, and the number of licensed drivers in an area.  "Many long hours of training and sacrifice lead up to this exciting day," said SCHP Col. Michael Oliver.  At each graduation, the Patrol presents distinguished awards to outstanding troopers from the class.  The winners from the 2017 Basic Class 101 are:  Trooper Spencer Nieto of Goose Creek is the winner of the Outstanding Achievement Award.  TroNieto was diagnosed with cancer in his 16th week of training.  Throughout his treatments, he remained committed and graduated with honors.  Trooper Chad Richards was presented with the Marksmanship Award after he demonstrated the best marksmanship during fire training.  Lastly, Trooper Stephen Steagall of Gaffney was presented the Physical Fitness Award after he excelled on all physical training test during each exercise.  The South Carolina Highway Patrol strives to ensure public safety by protecting and serving the people of South Carolina.

6/16/17

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State Police warn warmer weather poses danger for children

Kentucky Hot Car tips

The Kentucky State Police have issued a warning to remind parents not to leave a child alone in a hot car.  Police say law enforcement agencies answer calls every year about unattended children in vehicles.  KidsandCars.org reported that 39 children died in the U.S. during 2016 from vehicular heat stroke.  Kentucky State Police Lt. Michael Webb said vehicle heat stroke is often misunderstood, and a majority of parents are misinformed and would like to believe that they could never "forget" their child in a vehicle.  "The most dangerous mistake a parent can make is to think leaving a child alone in their car could never happen to them," Webb said.  "In these fast-paced times, it is easy for parents to get distracted and forget their child is in the car with them."  Webb said that the interior of a car heats up very quickly and temperatures inside can reach 125 degrees in minutes.  "A child's body heats up three to five times faster than that of an adult," Webb said.  "The temperature inside a car can rise 19 degrees in 10 minutes.  Together, this can be deadly in a very short period of time."  Kentucky passed "Bryan's Law" in 2000, which makes a person liable for a second-degree manslaughter or first-degree wanton endangerment for leaving a child younger than eight years old in a motor vehicle where circumstances pose a grave risk of death.  Police have also asked citizens to keep an eye out for children left in vehicles on hot days and to call 911 if they think the occupant is in danger.  

Police have offered the following safety tips:

• Never leave a child in an unattended car, even with the windows down.

• Be sure that all occupants leave the vehicle when unloading. Don't overlook sleeping babies.

• Always lock your car. If a child is missing, check the car first, including the trunk. Teach your children that vehicles are never to be used as a play

  area.

• Keep a stuffed animal in the car seat and when the child is put in the seat, place the animal in the front with the driver as a reminder.

• Place your purse or briefcase in the back seat as a reminder that you have your child in the car.

• Make ‘look before you leave’ a routine whenever you get out of the car.

6/15/17

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