Long-time Maine State Police member tapped to lead agency

ME Colonel Ross


Maine’s governor has promoted a long-time member of the Maine State Police to serve as its new leader.

Democratic Gov. Janet Mills said Wednesday that William Ross will serve as the new colonel of the police agency. Ross is currently the operations major for Maine State Police and has worked in law enforcement for more than 20 years.

Ross joined the Maine State Police as a trooper in 2002 and later received a series of promotions to his current post. His position of operations major requires him to oversee eight patrol troops and three major crime units.

Ross will succeed former Colonel John Cote who retired in September. Ross must be confirmed by the Maine State Senate to ascend to the new role.

Line

 

Trooper stops wrong-way driver on Phoenix freeway: DPS

az trooper stops wrong way driver pic 11823

PHOENIX - An Arizona Department of Public Safety trooper was injured on Sunday after crashing with a wrong-way vehicle to stop it on Loop 202 near 44th Street.

At about 11 p.m., the trooper got in the way of the wrong-way driver and rammed the vehicle with his patrol car to stop it, according to DPS spokesperson Bart Graves. The trooper had minor injuries and was taken to a hospital as a precaution.

The wrong-way driver also had minor Injuries reported.

The unidentified trooper was released from the hospital as of Monday and was recovering at home.Line

Son of retired Dunmore state trooper becomes 4th generation to join Pennsylvania State Police

Pa Trp Web story

Richard Andrew Grippi was just 3 months old when his mother dressed him in a replica state police trooper uniform for his first photo shoot.

It was, Shannon Grippi thought at the time, a cute photo to join pictures of three generations of men in the Grippi family who served in the Pennsylvania State Police dating back to 1938.

Twenty-three years later, Shannon Grippi, 51, of Dunmore, looks back to that day and wonders if destiny was at play. She and other family members watched her now-grown son graduate from the state police academy on Friday.

The accomplishment makes him the fourth generation in the Grippi family to join the ranks of the state police. Officials believe that's a first for the 117-year-old law enforcement agency, although they could not confirm that through human resources records.

Richie, as he's known by family, is a 2018 graduate of Dunmore High School. He enlisted in the state police in June after graduating from Penn State University with a bachelor's degree in criminal justice.

He is among 102 cadets who graduated Friday in Harrisburg.

He's continuing the legacy of his father, Richard F. Grippi, 53, Dunmore, who served from 1994 to 2019; grandfather, Richard J. Grippi, 78, Scranton, who served from 1971 to 1999, and great-grandfather, Peter Grippi, who served from 1938 to 1965. Another relative, Frank Grippi, his father's uncle, also served in the state police from 1968 to 1990.Another relative, Frank Grippi, his father's uncle, also served in the state police from 1968 to 1990.Another relative, Frank Grippi, his father's uncle, also served in the state police from 1968 to 1990.

The ceremony was all the more special because his father and grandfather had the honor of presenting him with his badge.

"It was a very emotional, very proud moment to be able to do that with my dad," Richard F. Grippi said.

His father and mother said they never sought to influence his choice of profession. The photo came about on a whim, Shannon said, after she saw a stuffed bear dressed in the uniform at a friend's home.

"I saw it and said, 'Can we borrow it?'" she said.

They stripped the stuffed animal, then took their son, clad in the outfit, to the local Sears department store for the photo.

Richie Grippi will report to the Stroudsburg barracks on Jan. 3. His family is confident he will serve with honor and pride.

"To see my son go through it and be a fourth-generation Grippi state trooper is definitely, definitely an honor," the father said.

Line

State troopers rescue missing man lost deep in N.J. Stokes State Forest woods

New Jersey troopers found a missing man deep in the woods suffering from hypothermia just days before Christmas 11123 pic1New Jersey troopers found a missing man deep in the woods suffering from hypothermia just days before Christmas 11123 pic2New Jersey troopers found a missing man deep in the woods suffering from hypothermia just days before Christmas 11123 pic3New Jersey troopers found a missing man deep in the woods suffering from hypothermia just days before Christmas.

Thomas McHugh, 58, went to Stokes Forrest on a Utility Terrain Vehicle and got stuck on a tree stump.

He was missing for 30 hours and his daughter contacted police who began the desperate search.

"They immediately started looking because it was freezing," daughter Melissa McHugh said.

On Dec. 17, authorities followed his footprints in the snow and found he had become separated from his walking stick and his right boot.

They found him a short distance later, lying face up with labored breathing and a body temperature of 71 degrees.

The troopers took off their jackets to cover the man and put their ballistics vests under him to keep him off the frozen ground. Then they took turns rubbing him in an attempt to transfer body heat.

"It's like a sternum rub to get blood flowing, kind of generate heat by rubbing the chest, the chest is the most vital part of the body where you need to generate the most heat," Trooper Robert Hoffman said.

McHugh had apparently walked away from his stuck vehicle to try to find help but got lost.

"He got disoriented and then he said he sat down and he doesn't remember anything after that, he must have passed out," Melissa McHugh said.

The troopers walked two and half miles through the woods to locate the victim. At that time there was snow on the ground so following the trail was easier.

Six state troopers were able to carry McHugh half a mile in the cold, dark woods to an awaiting emergency vehicle that took him to the hospital.

He has now fully recovered thanks to the state troopers who say they were trained to save lives.

"We don't get a lot of times to have this type of ending, but you know what, it does feel good," said Det. Darren Crane.Line

SC Highway Patrol Holds Graduation Ceremony, Welcomes 37 New Troopers

SC Highway Patrol Holds Graduation Ceremony Welcomes 37 New Troopers 11023 pic1SC Highway Patrol Holds Graduation Ceremony Welcomes 37 New Troopers 11023 pic2

Fri, 12/16/2022

COLUMBIA — The South Carolina Highway Patrol held a graduation ceremony today for 37 troopers from its Highway Patrol Basic Classes 120 and 121. The two graduating classes include five prior-certified officers and 32 who are new to the law enforcement profession. The graduation of these two classes brings the total number of troopers in South Carolina to 754 (including today’s graduates and 32 troopers currently in training).* Lieutenant Governor Pamela Evette addressed the graduates as the keynote speaker for the ceremony.

“Today, we honor this group of 37 law enforcement professionals as they join our agency in its critical mission of saving lives on South Carolina’s highways,” said Robert G. Woods, IV, Director of the South Carolina Department of Public Safety. “These fine men and women are more than prepared to continue that mission and I am proud to welcome them to the ranks.”

Troopers are assigned to areas based upon population, calls for service, and the number of licensed drivers/registered vehicles in an area. To see where the troopers from Basic 120 and 121 are assigned, review the information in the link that includes their Troop assignments and photos: https://scdps.sc.gov/schp/classes.

“We are here to celebrate your well-deserved accomplishments, for all of your hard work and dedication,” said Colonel Christopher Williamson, Commander of the SC Highway Patrol. “But before you rest this evening, I have one more request of you — I ask that you reflect on what it means to be a state trooper and why you chose to commit to this profession. Use your meaning and drive in service of others and I promise, you will make a difference.”

Special awards from Basic 120 and 121 classes include:

Major Israel Brooks, Jr. Physical Fitness Award:  Presented to the trooper who excelled on the physical training test and each day during the early morning exercises. 

            Basic 120: John P. Burnette
            Basic 121: Andrew T. Allen

Captain Cecil Dilworth Marksmanship Award: Presented to the trooper who demonstrated the best marksmanship during firearms training.

            Basic 120: Gabriel J. Buck
            Basic 121: Brandon J. Townsend

Colonel P.F. Thompson Outstanding Achievement Award: For the trooper who displays the character and dedication symbolic of former Highway Patrol Colonel P.F. Thompson, the longest serving Patrol commander.

           Basic 120: William G. Mixon
           Basic 121: Andrew T. Allen
Line