Washington State Patrol graduates 39 troopers

WSP November 2017 graduation

Thirty-nine state troopers were sworn in Thursday at a ceremony in Olympia, officially beginning their service.  Governor Jay Inslee and Washington State Patrol Chief John R. Batiste recognized the cadets at the swearing-in ceremony.  “Twenty-six weeks of training has prepared you for the moment that has led you to stand before us today,” said Batiste.  Cadets train for over 1,000 hours in defensive driving, firearms management and how to interact with the public.  “You are the recipients of the best training of any law enforcement agency in the United States,” said Inslee.  The Washington State Patrol Academy produces approximately three cadet classes each biennium, accounting for about 100 to 120 new troopers.  Only about four to six percent of the total number of applicants makes the grade to become state troopers.

11/6/17

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Fallen South Carolina trooper laid to rest after he 'accomplished his mission'

SCHP Funeral of trooper killed in line of duty

The South Carolina Department of Public Safety mourned the death of trooper Daniel Keith Rebman, Jr. who was buried Sunday in Greenville.  The funeral services were held at Bob Jones University, and graveside services were held at Woodlawn Cemetery.  Rebman died after his patrol vehicle was struck early in the morning on Oct. 24.  He is the 51st state trooper to die serving the state of South Carolina, according to the SCDPS.  “Tuesday was a reminder that while – yes, we are strong – we are not invincible,” SCDPS director Leroy Smith said in a news release.  “We too are subject to the same forces of nature, accidents and violence – just like those we protect.  I believe that is why ‘Blessed Are the Peacemakers’ is such a comforting verse at a time like this.  It is these special people – the peacemakers – who are so blessed because they risk their lives for you, and me and for strangers.  Trooper Rebman was doing just that on October 24, 2017.”  Rebman, 31, died from injuries sustained in a line-of-duty collision.  Rebman was stationary in his Patrol vehicle in the emergency lane of I-385 near Bridges Road when his Ford Taurus Patrol car was struck from behind by a pick-up truck around 12:23 a.m., according to the SCDPS.  Private visitation services were held Saturday for family and friends of Rebman, who is survived by his wife, Michelle, and three young daughters – Olivia, Charlee, and Kennedy.  Rebman always desired to serve his community, and shortly after moving to Greenville in 2011 he began to pursue a career in law enforcement, according to his obituary posted by the Mackey Mortuary.  After serving as a dispatcher for the Highway Patrol for 4 years, he graduated from the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy in 2016, at which time he was awarded the Captain Cecil Dilworth Marksmanship Award.  Rebman joined South Carolina Highway Patrol in September 2016.  The Orlando, Fla. native began his career in Troop Six/Charleston/Berkeley before being transferred to Troop Three/Greenville.  “He believed in his mission and he accomplished his mission,” Smith said of Rebman, who was given full honors by the South Carolina Highway Patrol.  “And for that, the state of South Carolina says a humble and grateful ‘job well done, Trooper Rebman.’ ”  Members from more than 15 state patrols from as far away as California came to pay their respects along with hundreds of state and local officers.  “Trooper Rebman died as he lived – a quiet hero – to his family, to his fellow troopers, to his church, and to his community,” SCHP Col. Chris Williamson said in a news release.  “Trooper Rebman’s death was a cruel reminder that this job doesn’t come with promises or reassurances.  But I want to remind our men and women in uniform that even through this sense of tremendous heartache and loss, we must continue to lean on each other and assume the watch from this point forward.”  “Trooper Rebman died as he lived – a quiet hero – to his family, to his fellow troopers, to his church, and to his community,” SCHP Col. Chris Williamson said in a news release. “Trooper Rebman’s death was a cruel reminder that this job doesn’t come with promises or reassurances. But I want to remind our men and women in uniform that even through this sense of tremendous heartache and loss, we must continue to lean on each other and assume the watch from this point forward.”    Michelle Rebman shared an example of law enforcement rallying around the family of their fallen brother.  She posted a picture on Facebook Saturday of a fellow trooper sitting on the grass with one of Rebman’s daughters.  In addition to his wife and children, Rebman is survived by his parents, Daniel and Theresa Rebman, of Georgia, a sister and many extended family.

11/1/17

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State Highway Patrol troopers seize 70 pounds of marijuana

OSP Pot bust

The Ohio State Highway Patrol has filed felony charges against a California man after a Tuesday traffic stop in Wood County.  Troopers stopped a 2001 Acura MDX with California license plates on Oct. 24 at 12:05pm.  The driver, 25-year-old Pablo Ryan Herrerra of California, was pulled over for a following too close violation on I-80 near milepost 65.  A Patrol drug-sniffing dog alerted to the vehicle, and officers found 70 pounds of marijuana, valued at approximately $280,000.  Herrerra was charged with possession and trafficking in marijuana, both second-degree felonies.

10/30/17

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North Carolina Highway Patrol troopers aim to combat misconceptions

NCHP Ride Along

“We are not here to hand out tickets and to put people in jail.  We are here to save lives.”  Those were the words Tuesday of N.C. Highway Patrol 1st Sgt. Jimmie Silver during a near daylong ride-along as he talked about misconceptions and stereotypes that surround the agency.  The ride-along was meant to illustrate everything the Highway Patrol does in order to keep Twin Counties drivers safe on and off the area’s roads each day.  From changing a flat tire to reminding a driver about a license plate that was about to fall from her car to responding to a wreck on Interstate 95 and more, Silver showed what troopers do each day to keep drivers safe.  He stressed throughout the day that changing the view of what the agency does is important due to people’s perception of not just the Highway Patrol but law enforcement in general.  “People think law enforcement is out to get them,” Silver said.  “I think that is because there is so much negativity surrounding law enforcement on television.”  He added parents telling their children that the police might come to get them if they misbehave does not help combat those stereotypes and misconceptions, either.  Local resident Keauna Blunt, who is a parent, said her perception of the Highway Patrol was only positive after trooper Macy Cannon changed a flat tire on Blunt’s car.  “I feel like this is great,” Blunt said.  “This is a wonderful thing because I really needed this.”  Cannon said knowing she made a positive difference in someone’s life just by changing a tire made her happy.  “Being able to help anybody makes doing this job worth it,” Cannon said with a smile.  Changing Blunt’s tire was just one of the ways that the Highway Patrol made a positive difference Tuesday in the Twin Counties.  Silver reminded one driver along U.S. 64 that she was about to lose her license plate because it was not secured and educated another about ways that a seatbelt can be worn without it causing discomfort, rather than giving the driver a ticket.  Silver said that both stops ending peacefully was encouraging.  “It makes you feel good,” Silver said, adding not every stop is so peaceful.  Keeping drivers safe from each other and from themselves is just one more way the Highway Patrol keeps the state’s roads safe.  Its employees also work in the state’s many weigh stations, making sure tractor-trailers are not overloaded or improperly loaded.  Silver said tracking tractor-trailers — along with checking the state’s rest stops, schools and other locations — is another side of troopers’ work that few people know about.  He said he hopes that by showing that work and everything else that troopers do, drivers would see that the Highway Patrol “is not out to get anyone, but just to save lives.”  Silver, who is also a military veteran, recently announced he will retire from the N.C. Highway Patrol at the end of this month.

10/27/17

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New York State Police make a major drug seizure

NYSP drugs seizure

On October 21, 2017, the New York State Police Community Narcotics Enforcement Team (CNET), in conjunction with the Dutchess County District Attorney’s Office, conducted a narcotics investigation resulting in the arrest of a Poughkeepsie man on felony drug charges.  State Police made a major drug seizure of approximately 12 kilograms of cocaine and 42 pounds of marihuana.  The estimated street value of the illegal drugs is over two million dollars.  K9 Rickie and his handler assisted with the seizure of the drugs.

10/26/17

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