South Dakota Highway Patrol graduates 12 recruits

SDHP Patrol Cruiser

Twelve new recruits officially join South Dakota’s Highway Patrol at a graduation ceremony Friday, April 13, in the State Capitol Rotunda in Pierre. Class 60 consists of nine men andthree women.  Graduation was the culmination of a one-year period which started with the recruits making the initial application to the Highway Patrol. After being selected, the recruits completed eight months of training which included basic law enforcement training, attending the South Dakota Highway Patrol Recruit Academy and finally, field training. “We always tell our recruits that it is not easy to become a Highway Patrol trooper, but we want them ready for any situation they might face,” says Col. Craig Price, superintendent of the South Dakota Highway Patrol. “Graduation is a major achievement for the recruits and their families. We are proud to share the moment with them.” “These recruits bring their own backgrounds, life experiences and skills to the Highway Patrol,” says Col. Price. “Each of them will help make the Patrol stronger and better able to meet the needs of the public.” Gov. Dennis Daugaard was the guest speaker for the ceremony. At the end of graduation, the new troopers received their patrol cars which were parked behind the state Capitol. Many of the graduates are scheduled to be on duty as early as Saturday, April 14.

4/10/18

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Maryland State Police gets its first female barrack commander

MSP Female Commander

The first female commander of the Maryland State Police’s Westminster Barrack doesn’t see the barrier-breaking achievement to be of particular significance — but she understands that, to others, it’s a big deal. “As far as significance, it is not significant to me,” Lt. Rebecca Bosley wrote in an email. “However, I do understand that it may be significant for other people, and it is important to have role models, so I understand that it is important to show a younger generation that having a leadership position and being female is possible.” Sheriff Jim DeWees, who previously held the commander position during his career with MSP, said Bosley has the skills needed to gain the respect of those she leads, and that’s more significant than her gender. “It doesn’t matter whether you’re a male or female as long as you can lead troopers,” he said. Bosley said she anticipates that leadership training and communication skills will be crucial in her new role. “Speaking with the community and providing people information is imperative. Transparency and fairness is critical for community involvement,” she wrote in an email. Bosley took command on Feb. 14, succeeding Lt. Patrick McCrory, who had been in place since 2013. She has moved around quite a bit during her career with MSP, but she keeps returning to Westminster, which was her first assignment after graduating from the police academy. She was in Carroll until 2008, when she was promoted and transferred to Frederick. She returned to Westminster as a corporal and was named Non-Commissioned Officer of the Year for the barrack in 2010. But then she was on the move again, promoted to sergeant and transferred to Howard County, where she was the NCO of the year for the Waterloo Barrack in 2012. She was then selected to command the newly developed DUI enforcement team known as State Police Impaired Driving Effort (SPIDRE) and commanded that unit until she was promoted to first sergeant and transferred to the Rockville Barrack. Bosley was promoted to lieutenant in January 2017 and took command of the Motor Vehicle Division. Then, in February, she was sent back to where she began, as commander of the Westminster Barrack. “Lt. Bosley has an outstanding work ethic, upholds and demands a high standard of integrity, is extremely reliable and she wants to ensure the Westminster Barrack provides the best law enforcement service in Carroll County,” said Capt. Shawn Ward, commander of the Central Troop of MSP via email. DeWees said having Bosley in the command position has further enhanced the relationship between their two agencies. Bosley attends weekly meetings with the command staff of the Sheriff’s Office, allowing the agencies to “gather our resources and fight the same issues,” DeWees said. Bosley is familiar with much of his command staff. He added that on top of having strong ties to Carroll, “They couldn’t have found a more competent person.” When asked what people may not know about the life of a law enforcement officer, Bosley said, “What I would like people to understand is we are doing a job and it is not personal.” Law enforcement officers typically see people at their worst, she said, and that limited interaction isn’t sufficient to make a judgment. “We are normal, everyday people who just want to make a difference for the better,” she said.

4/9/18

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Patrol cars issued to new Kansas Highway Patrol troopers

KHP new troopers get cars

Kansas Highway Patrol Troopers are riding in style. Thirty-eight troopers and five Capitol Police officers from KHP's 57th class received their personal patrol cars Thursday at Phillip Billard Airport in Topeka. The troopers graduated in December but have spent nearly 80 days training with veteran troopers. Now, that their training is done, they are being released to patrol Kansas' roadway on their own. "Definitely you feel like you've earned it. It's an amazing feeing to be a part of the Kansas Highway Patrol to just continue and be a part of that tradition," said Trooper Gustavo Ramirez. The graduating class was one of the largest in KHP history. 

4/4/18

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Connecticut State Trooper killed in vehicle crash

Kevin M. Miller CSP 

Trooper Kevin Miller was killed in a vehicle crash on eastbound I-84, in Tolland, at approximately 12:30 pm. on Thursday, March 29

His patrol car collided with the back of a tractor-trailer that was traveling slower than other traffic in the right lane of the interstate.

Trooper Miller was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran. He had served with the Connecticut State Police for 19 years and was assigned to Troop C. He is survived by two children.

4/3/18

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Washington State Troopers care for baby after mom is arrested for DUI

 WSP care for infant

A powerful photo that captured many in the Tri-Cities, a Washington State Trooper caring for a 10-month-old baby. After officers arrested the mother for suspicion of DUI, along with reckless endangerment of a child. Washington State Troopers said a trained airplane pilot, observed multiple violations through their patrol air craft. Including speeding and driving too close to other vehicles. Washington State Trooper, Carlos Mata, was called to the area where he located the vehicle, pulling her over on I-82, Westbound, near Kennewick. “There were a lot of open containers of alcohol and there was a strong smell of alcohol,” said Mata. Trooper Mata, said the mother claims she had been drinking the night before and felt dizzy in the morning but needed to get to town. After police said she failed a sobriety test, blowing a total of .198 over twice the legal limit, they booked her into the Benton County Jail. Authorities said at the jail her alcohol percentage escalated to .235, two and half times the legal limit. Trooper Mata said, “we made multiple attempts to reach a family member to come pick up the child and were unsuccessful, at first.” This then forced troopers to bring the child back to the state patrol office, where troopers cared for the infant. “Yesterday, it took a couple of troopers off the road just to care for the infant here at the office, tying about three units,” said Mata. But it was worth it, within a few hours the troopers say the father came for the baby and authorities say they are happy to know the infant was safe at the end of the day. “It’s good to know you made a difference that day and you might have saved somebody's life,” said Mata.

4/3/18

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