California Highway Patrol Officer intentionally struck my motorcyclist

 

A motorcyclist using a shoulder lane to pass traffic on State Route 52 accelerated into a California Highway Patrol (CHP) officer, striking him, officials confirmed to NBC 7 San Diego.  The incident happened at approximately 3:15 p.m. Wednesday on eastbound State Route 52 at Summit near San Diego's Tierrasanta neighborhood, according to CHP officer Catano.   At the time, three officers were responding to another accident when one standing on the right shoulder spotted the motorcyclist trying to pass everyone, according to officials on scene.   One officer put his hands up to try and stop the motorcyclist, but instead, the motorcyclist accelerated and went straight for the officer, hitting him.  Investigators believe the incident was intentional and are carrying on the investigation as assault on an officer. The suspect has been taken into custody.  He is identified to be 26-year-old Christopher Ryan Warner of El Cajon.  Medics were requested for one patient. An initial report showed the officer suffered minor injuries, though that could change pending a complete evaluation. Traffic on EB SR-52 came to nearly a standstill for afternoon commuters.  No other information was immediately available.

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Oregon State Trooper wounded on Christmas night continues to improve

Oregon injured trooper

Nic Cederberg, an Oregon State Police trooper injured in a Christmas night shootout, was shot 12 times in the arms and torso, his brother said this week.  Jeff Cederberg posted on the family's GoFundMe account on Tuesday that his brother had given him permission to begin sharing details about the events of that night, which left two people dead and Cederberg in serious condition at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital.  "What many don't know is how bad it really was that night," Jeff Cederberg wrote.  "Most can speculate but few know what really happened."  Jeff Cederberg's comments are some of the first detailed accounts of the shooting, which investigators have been hesitant to give out, citing the pending investigation by the Washington County Major Crimes Team and the district attorney's office.  Cederberg, a state trooper stationed at the OSP's work site in North Plains, was shot by 30-year-old James Tylka, a former Beaverton Police Department cadet, whom police say had killed his estranged wife Katelynn Tylka-Armand, 24, of Beaverton, outside his parents' home in King City early that evening.  Cederberg was having Christmas dinner with his family when he received a call about the shooting in King City. "I'm going to see what I can do to help," Jeff Cederberg remembered his brother saying during a candlelight vigilon Jan. 2.  "Nic went out and saved lives that night.  He put his life on the line to protect those who couldn't do it themselves."  According to Sherwood Police Chief Jeff Groth, Cederberg chased Tylka and confronted him on Southwest Gimm Lane, just outside of Sherwood.  Jeff Cederberg said that the shots were fired from about a dozen feet away, during a "gun fight in a phone booth" in Sherwood.  "Almost every one of his rounds, three magazine's worth, had been fired when it was all said and done," Jeff Cederberg wrote.  "When the shooting stopped and all went quiet Nic knew he was in serious trouble.  As he lay there for a little more than two minutes by himself bleeding, he locked in mentally and found a way to survive."  Five shots were stopped by Cederberg's bulletproof vest, but seven others struck him in both arms and torso, hitting his lungs and abdomen.  Two others hit his spinal canal, nearly paralyzing him.  Four bullets were still lodged in his body when he arrived at OHSU that night, Jeff Cederberg said.  One is still in his lower spine, which Jeff Cederberg said will likely stay there for the rest of his life.  Tylka was shot and killed by officers, according to the Washington County Sheriff's Office.  Five police officers fired their weapons during the gunfight, including officers from Hillsboro, Tualatin and Sherwood police departments.  All remain on administrative leave as the investigation continues.  After Tylka was killed, officers from Sherwood grabbed a trauma bag from his police vehicle and began to render first aid to Cederberg.  Officers used tourniquets to stop the bleeding, Groth said.  Groth said that the actions of those officers "played a vital role" in Cederberg's survival.  "What (Nic Cederberg had) with him were experienced officers who knew how to pack bullet wounds correctly and this ultimately save Nic's life," Jeff Cederberg wrote.  "…The only reason he is still here today is someone was watching over him that night, I firmly believe it.  Any one of those 12 bullets should have killed him and they didn't."  Cederberg's recovery is moving along, his brother said. Cederberg is expected to be released from the hospital soon to begin physical therapy.  Money continues to pour into several GoFundMe accountsset up for victims of the Christmas night shooting.  Cederberg's GoFundMe account has raised more than $80,000, which Jeff Cederberg said will help his brother get through tough times ahead.  "This is not a reward or bonus for doing his job that night," Jeff Cederberg wrote in a previous post earlier this week.  "What this GoFundMe account is really for is to give Nic as well as his wife Hayley what they need the most and that is time.  Time to heal, time to rest, time to decompress, time for Nic and Hayley to be together and breathe easy knowing that thousands of people have their back and that we will stand watch for them now."

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North Dakota Highway Patrol Honor Guard serves special purpose for troopers, families

ND Honor Guard

A lot of workplaces have different ways to honor their members, but North Dakota Highway Patrol is raising the bar by recognizing fellow troopers and state law enforcement. Highway Patrol recently started its own Honor Guard to celebrate the lives of those in their department and members of other law enforcement agencies. This dedicated group of 16 troopers has a special purpose. Posting the colors is just one of the routines Highway Patrol Honor Guard members do. Since 2013 troopers have learned this and much more. "They first learn how to march and how to get in formation, and then they grow into how to do a flag fold over a casket, how to do a firing volley at a funeral," says Lt. Daniel Haugen, Highway Patrol Honor Guard Commander. After attending the training camp in Minnesota, the group of 16 troopers perform at celebrations of troopers' lives, retirement parties and various state functions. The training leads to a rewarding experience. "It means a lot to the individuals that belong to this group. We are given special uniforms that look really good, and it means a lot to us when we see the look on the families faces," says Haugen. Haugen says Honor Guard uniforms are modeled off their old uniforms and a military formal dress uniform. Besides the special detailing, members wear a badge recognizing their position in the Honor Guard. A position which requires great sacrifice. "We have a really dedicated team of troopers on the Honor Guard that drop what they are doing, and with two days notice, will travel somewhere in the state of North Dakota and help a family get through a funeral," says Haugen. The department is one of several agencies in the state who have their own Honor Guard. Honor Guard members have a wide range of experience within the department. Haugen says some members have close to 20 years with Highway Patrol.

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Michigan State Police get 50 black patrol cars to mark 100th Anniversary

MSP New Cruisers 100th AnniversaryMSP 1937 Ford Model

The Michigan State Police fleet is getting 50 special edition black and gold patrol cars as part of efforts to mark the department’s 100th anniversary.  The agency says the 2016 Dodge Chargers hitting the road starting Wednesday are painted to resemble the department’s 1937 Ford Model 74 patrol car.  The Model 74 was one of the department’s first patrol cars.  State police say they used black and gold cars until 1954, when they were changed to the current blue color.  Each of the state police’s 30 posts will get at least one 100th anniversary patrol car for use on general patrol and at community events.  The agency says the patrol cars were purchased as part of the department’s annual fleet replacement, so no additional expenditures were made.

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Pennsylvania State Police receive new technology to help track crime trends

PSP new technology

State police say a $7 million technology upgrade that's being phased in will allow troopers to get a better handle on where crime is more likely to happen based on crime reporting trends.  The upgraded computer system, which is expected to be fully functional next year, will help troopers perform their jobs more effectively, officials said.  It also will help provide a level of safety by allowing troopers to receive better information, such as photographs, about suspects and individuals they detain.  “It will increase efficiency and enhance trooper safety,” said Cpl. Joe Koval, president of the State Troopers Association in Harrisburg.  The modernization happens at a time when concerns about police safety have intensified.  There have been several deadly attacks against officers, including in Pennsylvania, amid mounting tensions nationwide over high-profile killings by police.  While the technology upgrade will help improve safety for troopers in their dealings with the public, there are other benefits for the agency and officers.  Troopers will get information about where crime will likely happen based on up-to-date crime reporting trends.  Managers can then adjust assignments.  The system will allow troopers to more rapidly get information and do their jobs, state police Capt. Sean Georgia said.  A “problem-specific policing” database — which analyzes how and where crimes are happening — is a part of the system, he said.  The new records management system is already installed for noncriminal data, but the criminal data portion is being rolled out in phases.  The records management system will track all contact between troopers and individuals — even in cases where there isn't an arrest.  The system received a pilot test months ago by 115 troopers in five stations in the Hazleton area.  Capt. David T. Dougalas said the “modernization was well received” and the troopers made suggestions to improve it.  The new system will allow troopers for the first time to file incident reports from their patrol cars without having to go to state police offices.  It will improve safety because photos of suspects can be rapidly sent to troopers for their protection, Koval said.  “It will help to keep our men and women on the road longer,” he said.  Georgia said troopers will get four weeks of hands-on training.  At the Kiski Valley station, Sgt. Ryan Maher said the new records system will eliminate many paper reports.  “It will save money and time,” he said.  The new system will replace the state police's first electronic records system, which was put into statewide use in 2005.  Police say it was the start of a computer-based system to identify crime trends and where drunken-driving accidents and deaths occurred more frequently.  That current system replaced troopers putting colored pins on maps.  A cluster of pins of the same color showed a trend such as burglaries in one neighborhood, said Capt. Thomas E. Dubovi, who worked with both methods when he was assigned at the Kittanning state police station.  He now supervises the investigative records system.  “The system will allow us to be data driven rather than paper driven” and record all contacts with PSP, he said.  Georgia said the state is separately upgrading its radio system to more easily access other law enforcement radios.  That upgrade will make it easier for troopers to contact municipal, county and state police officers who are on different radio systems instead of using cellphones.

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