Florida Highway Patrol finds more than $1.5 million in drugs, contraband

 

In a three-day operation, state troopers made 122 misdemeanor arrests, 61 felony arrests and 75 drug arrests and caught up with eight people who were fugitives or sought by a warrant, the Florida Highway Patrol said Friday.  The Highway Patrol's criminal interdiction unit, in a partnership with the North Florida High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, conducted the operation in the Duval County region.  The detail went from April 11 to April 13, and it targeted illegal drugs, illegal activity and contraband, FHP said.  Troopers called this a “highly successful event.”  Investigators seized four stolen vehicles, eight illegal firearms, about $12,000 worth of stolen merchandise, $687 in U.S. currency, 416 pounds of synthetic marijuana, 286 grams of marijuana, 95.87 grams of powder cocaine, 4.1 grams of crack cocaine, 2.4 grams of heroin, six grams of methamphetamine, 11.6 grams of MDMA (Ecstasy), 13 grams of illegal prescription medication, and assorted drug paraphernalia.  The estimated value of all the items was listed as $1,531,308, according to FHP.

4/24/17

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Trooper from Mississippi runs in Boston Marathon and finished in the top 9%

MHP Trooper Kindle Jones running Boston Marathon

A Mississippi Highway Patrolman recently home after running in the Boston Marathon.  Trooper Wade Jones trained for months for the race.  “I always say if you’re not comfortable while you’re training, you’re not getting any better,” Jones said.  Jones' training paid off because he finished in the top 9%. He was the 2,690th person to cross the finish line of more than 31,000 runners.  Out of the Mississippians who ran in this year's Boston Marathon, Jones placed 2nd.  He said running is stress relief and something he loves doing. His goal for the next race is to come in first in the state.  “My dad, because of an accident he had, was supposed to go.  His goal was for me to be the best in Mississippi.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to accomplish that, but I guess I’ll settle for second for right now though,” Jones said.  “But hey, it will give me something to shoot for next time -- to be the first place out of Mississippi.”  Jones said he’s been running for 12 or 13 years, but this is his first time competing in the Boston Marathon.  He finished in about three hours and nine minutes.

4/21/17

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Mississippi trooper home from impressive run in Boston Marathon

MHP Trooper Kindle Jones running Boston Marathon

A Mississippi Highway Patrolman recently home after running in the Boston Marathon.  Trooper Wade Jones trained for months for the race.  “I always say if you’re not comfortable while you’re training, you’re not getting any better,” Jones said.  Jones' training paid off because he finished in the top 9%. He was the 2,690th person to cross the finish line of more than 31,000 runners.  Out of the Mississippians who ran in this year's Boston Marathon, Jones placed 2nd.  He said running is stress relief and something he loves doing. His goal for the next race is to come in first in the state.  “My dad, because of an accident he had, was supposed to go.  His goal was for me to be the best in Mississippi.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to accomplish that, but I guess I’ll settle for second for right now though,” Jones said.  “But hey, it will give me something to shoot for next time -- to be the first place out of Mississippi.”  Jones said he’s been running for 12 or 13 years, but this is his first time competing in the Boston Marathon.  He finished in about three hours and nine minutes.

4/20/17

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Distracted driving can ruin your day or take your life

Distracted Driving

For drivers who believe that they can multitask safely while on the road — they're wrong.  It is universally known driving while distracted is dangerous. Study after study has shown distracted driving is unsafe.  In Florida, distracted driving crashes make up more than 12 percent of all crashes, and half of those crashes will result in injury or death.  Safety campaigns around the world reiterate the fact that distracted driving kills, yet still, drivers continue to reach for the cellphone, look down at their navigation system, turn around to talk to passengers in the vehicle, apply mascara or eat lunch while driving.  In South Florida alone, there were more than 10,400 distracted driving crashes in 2015.  In Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties 31 people were killed and 7,850 people were injured from crashes where a driver admitted to being distracted.  Preliminary numbers show that last year the Florida Highway Patrol worked one of the highest number of fatal crashes in Florida in the department's history.  Distracted driving crashes are increasing every year, and every day we read about tragic, preventable crashes on Florida roads.  When operating a motor vehicle, driving should always be your only focus.  In that split second that you look away from the road, take your hands off the wheel or stop focusing on driving, you don't see the family that just stepped into the crosswalk.  You don't see the light in front of you that just turned red.  You don't see the car in front of you that has come to a quick stop.  Statewide, more than 200 people were killed from distracted driving crashes last year.  That is 200 families changed forever.  We all see those drivers weaving around the lane as they text and drive, reading the newspaper, putting on makeup or dancing to the song on the radio as they race to their destinations.  They make us less safe on the road.  Driving distracted can not only hurt you and your passengers, but can greatly influence driving behavior of others, especially young, impressionable drivers.  Teens make up 4.5 percent of licensed drivers, yet in 2015, they were responsible for almost 12 percent of distracted driving crashes.  In fact, drivers under the age of 30 accounted for the highest rate of distracted driving crashes in 2015 and more than 12,000 crashes last year were caused by just being inattentive — not being focused on driving.  This April, the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles is reaching out to remind motorists the focus should always be on driving and getting to your destination safely.  Every day there are more than 125 distracted driving crashes across our state, more than five crashes every hour. Focus on driving, Florida.  Model good driving behavior and talk with kids about responsible driving to keep us all safe on the road.

4/20/17

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The fastest Mississippi runner in this year's Boston Marathon was Thomas Witter of the Mississippi Highway Patrol

MSP finishes first of other MSP trooper in marathon

The fastest Mississippi runner in this year's Boston Marathon was a 31-year-old man from Columbus.  Thomas Witter crossed the finish line in 3:02.20 on Monday, which put him No. 1,701 overall and first among those from the Magnolia State.  Another finisher, Bret Beauchamp of Oxford, was caught by an Associated Press photographer helping a runner cross the finish line.  Here's a list of the 27 finishers from Mississippi:

Thomas Witter (31, male, Columbus): 3:02.20

Kindle Jones (35, m, Mathiston): 3:09.24

Dan Vega (41, m, Hattiesburg): 3:10.24

Jim Brown (38, m, Tupelo): 3:14.30

Bryan Chase (42, m, Brandon): 3:15.12

Charles Wambolt (52, m, Long Beach): 3:15.44

Bret Beauchamp (42, m, Oxford): 3:25.40

Clayton Marshall (24, m, Vancleave): 3:29.19

Joe Mitchell (53, m, Biloxi): 3:34.43

Amy Chandler (36, female, Corinth): 3:35.52

Kevin Preston (54, m, Perkinston): 3:36.10

Erin Ball (37, f, Oxford): 3:40.36

Robby Callahan (53, m, Guntown): 3:41.59

Kristi Hall (38, f, Vicksburg): 3:44.23

Mary Krapac (52, f, Vicksburg): 3:48.20

Esther Sanders (47, f, Belden): 3:49.04

Lauren Jackson (32, f, Kiln): 3:50.40

Apryl Handy (31, f, Perkinston): 3:50.40

Lee Jones (41, f, Madison): 3:51.33

Jessica Ferguson (39, f, Hernando): 3:51.43

Kayleigh Skinner (24, f, Jackson): 3:55.52

Dawn Gregory (55, f, Gulfport): 3:57.45

Melanie Freeland (46, f, Brandon): 4:15.16

Jane Kersh (51, f, Hattiesburg): 4:24.36

Beverly Thompson (40, f, Oxford): 4:25.48

Susan Dobson (41, f, Petal): 4:53.10

Kenneth Williams (75, m, Corinth): 4:57.37

4/20/17

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