Trooper Timothy Pratt remembered as "hero of heroes" at funeral

 

The long gray line of the New York State Police got a lot longer and a lot more colorful Monday morning.  New York State troopers were joined by their brethren from Canada, Massachusetts and even Texas.  They were all in South Glens Falls to honor Tim Pratt, a man who was all in for South Glens Falls.  A founding member of the South High Marathon Dance, he was born and raised here.  Raised his family here. And today his funeral was held here, his sons doing the readings and his daughter adding humor to a somber ceremony.  Sarah Pratt reminding the 800 people gathered inside, including New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, how much Tim Pratt loved to laugh out loud.
  "His laugh was more like a scream.  Unique, a sound I will yearn to hear for the rest of my life," she said.  Tim Pratt died Wednesday morning after being hit by a car while helping a lost trucker.  Whether at work or in the community, Pratt lived to help others.
He was honored in 2015 by the Marathon Dance for all his years of support.  His children and granddaughter presenting him with a plaque.  "Happy to be here and make sure everybody gets home safe."  The deep-voiced Pratt is heard saying to the enthusiastic young dancers.  Time and again, people talk about a man who was there for his family, his community and the public.  "How lucky we are to have known a man who was so dedicated to helping others," said New York State Police Superintendent George Beach.  "Tim Pratt reminds us, his life and death, about all that is good and noble in the profession to protect and serve," said Bishop Emeritus Howard Hubbard, who assisted in the service.  At the end of the nearly two hour ceremony, with police officers from across the country standing at attention, Trooper Pratt was carried to the hearse and his children were helped to their father's troop car for the ride to the cemetery.  Sarah Pratt reminding them all, "And he is inside each of you in my family and his family, and will always be."

Line

New York State Trooper helps elderly man bury his dog

 

Trooper helps bury dog

 

A trooper from the New Lebanon barracks helped a Columbia County man retrieve and bury his dog after it was killed on State Route 22, State Police said Monday.  A 92-year-old Austerlitz man called troopers about 6 p.m. Oct. 4 to say his golden retriever had wandered away from his home and been struck by a car.  Trooper Louis E. Godfroy IV (pictured on the left with State Police Superintendent Joseph D'Amico) returned the dog's body to the man's home and realized the owner would not able to properly bury his dog.  The next day, when Godfroy was off duty, he returned to the River Road home and buried the man's beloved dog.  According to the State Police, "Godfroy helped a member of our community with compassion, courtesy and professionalism by taking the initiative to help the elderly couple with the loss of their family pet."

Line

New Paws are Hitting the Road in Connecticut

Connecticut K 9 graduation

 

At 10:00 a.m. Friday morning, 12 K9 handlers and their dogs graduated from the CSP K9 Academy today after 8 weeks of training.  All of the dogs are Labradors from Guiding Eyes in New York.  The handlers from State Police are all assigned to the Emergency Services Unit.  These troopers and their K9s frequently assist with sweeping venues that host significant events and also respond to bomb threats.  Two of the troopers, Tfc. Brian Faughnan (CSP) and Trooper Steve Sicard (MSP), are second time K9 handlers.  Officer Morelli retired from the State Police as a K9 handler/unit instructor and continues to use his skills with Mohegan Tribal Police Department.

Line

 

 

New Paws are Hitting the Road in Connecticut

Connecticut K 9 graduation

 

At 10:00 a.m. Friday morning, 12 K9 handlers and their dogs graduated from the CSP K9 Academy today after 8 weeks of training.  All of the dogs are Labradors from Guiding Eyes in New York.  The handlers from State Police are all assigned to the Emergency Services Unit.  These troopers and their K9s frequently assist with sweeping venues that host significant events and also respond to bomb threats.  Two of the troopers, Tfc. Brian Faughnan (CSP) and Trooper Steve Sicard (MSP), are second time K9 handlers.  Officer Morelli retired from the State Police as a K9 handler/unit instructor and continues to use his skills with Mohegan Tribal Police Department.

Line

 

 

Kentucky State Police graduates 39 new troopers

KSP Class94 grads LW18 20161028 195546

 

The Kentucky State Police Academy presented diplomas to 39 new troopers at ceremonies held in Frankfort Friday.  Their addition to the force brings the agency’s strength to a total of 911 troopers serving the citizens of the Commonwealth.  “I am pleased to welcome these 39 new troopers,” said KSP Commissioner Rick Sanders.  “It’s been a long, hard road and they have paid their dues. They have earned that patch and that badge.”  “Twenty-first century policing is a tough job,” he added. “These men and women have prepared to go out and be the best of the best as guardians of their communities.”  The new troopers are part of the agency’s 94th cadet class.  They reported for duty on May 22, 2016 in a class that consisted of 66 cadets.  Twenty-seven resigned during the rigorous 23-week training cycle that followed.  Six women started the program and four completed the training.  The training included more than 1,000 hours of classroom and field study in subjects such as constitutional law, juvenile and traffic law, use of force, weapons training, defensive tactics, first aid, high speed vehicle pursuit, criminal investigation, computer literacy, hostage negotiations, evidence collection, radio procedures, search and seizure, crash investigation, drug identification, traffic control, crowd control, armed robbery response, land navigation, electronic crimes, sex crimes, hate crimes, domestic violence, bomb threats and hazardous materials.  Several members of the class earned special recognitions including valedictorian Sarah Burgess, of Lexington, Ky., and salutatorian Joseph Kenny, of New Castle, Ky.  William Pope, of Harlan, Ky., received the Ernie Bivens Award, an honor presented to the cadet who, in the opinion of the KSP Academy staff supported by input from the cadets themselves, shows distinction as a class leader, strives for academic excellence and has excelled in all phases of the academy’s physical and vocational training.  Nicholas Brumback, of McKee, Ky., received the Commissioner’s Commitment to Excellence Award, which is presented to cadets who demonstrate leadership, the desire to get the job done and the determination to be the best every day.  Jeremey Hamilton, of Danville, Ky., received the Overall Fitness Award.  Three of the new troopers are from London. Lexington, Harlan and Stanford are each represented by two new troopers.  Each new trooper will be supervised by a training officer for six to eight weeks after reporting to their post assignments.

Line