South Dakota Highway Patrol donates bicycle to teenager

 

South Dakota donates bike

A young man who walks eight miles to and from work every day now has a more efficient form of transportation.  A few weeks ago, South Dakota Highway Patrol troopers in the Sioux Falls area received a call about someone walking on Interstate 229, the department posted on its Facebook page.  Sgt. Scott Swenson responded to the call and met a young man named Tanner who told Swenson he spends about an hour and a half every day walking to and from work.  "I had a squad meeting a few days later and we came up with an idea of getting him some better transportation," Swenson said Saturday.  The squad received a refurbished bike from the penitentiary and met up with Tanner again to give him the bike.  On Aug. 16, the Sioux Falls B Squad gave the teen a new bicycle.  This isn't the only time the department has given out bicycles.  Bikes refurbished in the penitentiary are often given to kids at events, Swenson said.  "This is a good example of what law enforcement does, not just in South Dakota but all over the country," Swenson said.

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Massachuets State Trooper and K-9 save man who attempted suicide

Massachusetts stop suicide

 

A Massachusetts State Trooper and his K-9 helped to save a man who had been attempting to commit suicide on Saturday afternoon.  State Police say the man – whose identity has not been released – had called 911 in a state of distress and told the operator he was going to kill himself. Police subsequently ascertained that the man was in Myles Standish State Forest, and Troopers from the Bourne State Police barracks, as well as the Air Wing, Plymouth Police, and a number of other agencies were deployed to look for him.  A State Trooper and his K-9 proceeded to track into the forest from the man's last known location, and within a short period of time they had found him hanging from a tree, police said.  The man was quickly cut down and EMS personnel transported him to a nearby hospital.  Police say the man is expected to survive, and called it a reminder that "a quick response can mean the difference between life and death."  No further information has been released at this time.

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2017 America's Best Looking Trooper Cruiser Calendar

 

Cruisers Picture

 

Order your "2017 America's Best Looking Trooper Cruiser Calendar" now!  Special discounted price for early ordering!  Only $10.  Delivery expected in late October, with plenty of time to give as gifts during the Holiday Season.  100% of the net proceeds over actual printing and mailing costs will be deposited in the AAST Foundation, which provides educational scholarships to dependent children of AAST Trooper Members.  Click on the link in the upper right corner to place your order NOW!   We are offering a special reduced price for those who order early.  The price will be increased after the calendars are printed.   Thank you all for your support of our contest, AAST and America's State Troopers!

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Rhode Island State Police begin "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over" Campaign

R. I. State Police Badge

 

Colonel Steven G. O'Donnell, Superintendent of the Rhode Island State Police and Commissioner of the Department of Public Safety, announces a partnering with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to stop drunk drivers and help save lives. The high-visibility national enforcement campaign, "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over" will commence on August 19, 2016 and end on September 5, 2016. During this period, state and local law enforcement will show zero tolerance for drunk driving. Increased state and national messaging about the dangers of driving drunk, coupled with increased troopers and officers on the road, aim to drastically reduce drunk driving on our state's roads. According to NHSTA, on average, over 10,000 people died each year in drunk-driving crashes.  In 2015, 15 lives were lost in the State of Rhode Island because of impaired drivers. "People need to understand that drunk driving is not only deadly, but it is illegal," said Colonel O'Donnell. "Drunk driving is a massive problem in the United States. Drivers need to pay attention to their own driving, but also to others on the road who could be driving drunk," he added. "It is your business.  If you think you see a drunk driver, call 911 and let us know." During the enforcement period, there will be a special emphasis on drunk-driving enforcement.  Local drivers should expect to see more marked as well as unmarked patrol vehicles and increased messaging about the dangers of drunk driving. "This is an unacceptable problem.  Drunk driving is selfish and dangerous.  We want to increase awareness with this campaign, but also see lasting results of decreased drunk driving," he said.  "This is important to remember: do not trust yourself when you drink," said Colonel O'Donnell.  "You may think you aren't drunk, but law enforcement will know you are.  Law enforcement officers' skills in detecting and identifying drunk drivers have never been better.  They will spot you and arrest you."  The Rhode Island State Police ask all to please plan ahead before you go out and designate a sober driver or use an alternative transportation service.  Whatever you do, do not drink and drive.  This August, and every day, remember: there is never an excuse to drink and drive.  If you choose to break the law, law enforcement will see you before you see them.  "Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over."  Motorists are reminded that they can immediately report dangerous drivers or hazardous roadway conditions to the police by dialing 9-1-1 on their cellular phones.

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North Carolina troopers receive lifesaving trauma kits

 

 

The North Carolina Highway Patrol and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have teamed up in the hope of preventing deaths due to blood loss. “Any time we have an active shooting situation, which seems to be occurring every day across the U.S., we go to the fight as they say,” said Lt. Jeff Gordon of the North Carolina State Highway Patrol.  Troopers are often the first responders to scenes involving traumatic injury, such as gunshot or stab wounds. Of the 1,400 or so troopers in North Carolina, about 100 of them are certified EMTs. However, they are often without the equipment needed to help trauma victims.  Doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center recognized the issue, and began designing Individual Patrol Officer Kits, or IPOKs, with troopers in mind, even before the shooting incidents in Orlando and Dallas.  “However, with those events happening, it gave us more credence and pushed us to make certain to be able to pull this project off,” said Physician Assistant Jeff Hinshaw of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.  The IPOKs contain a tourniquet, gloves, emergency trauma dressing, gauze and a vent compact chest seal.  “These particular devices, the tourniquets, the chest seals and the gauze can make a huge difference when it comes to saving somebody’s life,” Hinshaw said.  “The very first patient that I took care of who died from injuries died from the lack of a device like this,” added Dr. Wayne Meredith, also of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.  Two-hundred of the kits will be distributed amongst the troopers. One-hundred of the kits will be given to the troopers who are EMS trained, with the remainder to be used as replacements.  Not only will the kits be used on civilians, but also the troopers themselves should they be injured.  Troopers say that one law enforcement officer is killed every 61 hours in the United States. They added that two-thirds of the officers who die in the line of duty lose their lives due to a loss of blood.

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