CHP Officer's act of kindness helps man who lost wallet

 

CA Trooper

 

You've heard about acts of kindness among strangers, but here's one that breaks the mold.  The center divide of Interstate 80 is an unforgiving no-man's land populated by the broken down or the desperate.  Last Saturday night, John Badial of Vacaville fit the latter category. "All my money for the week, all the money we had was in the center divide," Badial said.  He's an auto mechanic and father of two who made the common mistake of leaving his wallet on the roof of the family car. "I went right over the bump and I happened to glance in my rear-view mirror and saw everything fall out of my wallet and hit the ground," Badial said.  California Highway Patrol Ofc. James Morrell doesn't often receive calls about people crawling around highway medians in the dark on their hands and knees.  "I thought he was broken down or ran out of gas, something like that," he said.  As Morrell soon learned those $200 meant everything to a man with a family living paycheck top paycheck. "Everything is accounted for. Every nickel gets spent, pretty much, so it was a huge loss for us," Badial said.  But there is more to this story because Morrell is second generation CHP and there was something about Badial's plight that touched him.  As he escorted him to a gas station, he noticed a cash machine nearby.  While Badial filled up his tank with gas, Morrell withdrew $60, walked over and gave it to him.  "Because that is how I was raised, my parents taught me to help everyone in any way that I'm able to do.  And that's again the reason why I got this job.  I wanted to help everybody," Morrell said.  "I was pretty thankful and got choked up about it because he doesn't know me from Adam, you know," Badial said.  They know each other, now.  Two strangers linked by bad luck and goodwill and an act of kindness on a busy highway.

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Maryland State Police troopers participate in 2016 Safety Fair to benefit the Maryland Food Bank.

 

Maryland Food Bank

 

Hundreds of Marylanders joined state troopers and their community partners at the JFK Highway Barrack's 2016 Safety Fair to benefit the Maryland Food Bank.  Almost 600 lbs. of food were collected while youngsters had a chance to see K-9 demonstrations, sit in Maryland State Police vehicles, and play a host of interactive games while enjoying the free Nathan's hot dogs.Line

Meet the newest member of the Georgia State Patrol

 

Georgias newest trooper

 

Meet the newest member of the Georgia State Patrol. He is going to be one tough K-9 when he grows up. #gsp #gatrooper

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Connecticut State Police on lookout for birds "jaywalking" on highways

 

Hawk in Connecticut

 

It’s been quite a week for the Connecticut State Police.  A homicide investigation, manhunts, DUI checkpoints, motor vehicle accidents.  But there is one story that put feather in troopers’ hats on social media:  A post on their Facebook page about a hawk walking on I-91 in Cromwell earlier this week.  The post on the Connecticut State Police’s Facebook page got over 1,000 shares and more than 320 comments.  Along with publishing photos of the hawk on the side of the highway, the pun-laden post took flight, triggering a flock of comments.  It read: “Troopers, Connecticut Department of Transportation service patrol and Connecticut State Environmental Conservation Police flocked to the area of I-91 north near exit 21 to provide some assistance to a hawk strolling along the shoulder.  Luckily things didn’t take a turn for the worse and we were able to take the hawk under our wing and protect it from the cars flying by.  No fowl play is suspected in this case - DEEP will be providing further assistance.”  The hawk, which did survive, was taken by Cromwell Animal Control to recover.  Days later, state police used the hawk story to get out a highway safety message. Using a photo of the hawk walking down the highway, Trooper Tyler Weerden, who is the state police’s social media specialist, created a graphic titled “Hawk’s Corner. Winging Good Information Your Way.” It answered the question:  “recently saw a hawk on the highway and couldn’t help but wonder if any laws were broken?”  After saying no laws were broken “just a few ruffled feathers,” it listed want is not allowed on the highway, like pedestrians, Segways, golf carts and “shenanigans.”  The post, again, received a number comments and likes including one from Eva MariaPuo:  “I have to say you guys are managing this page very well.  You find creative and funny ways to get message across.  Kudos to your social media rep!”  Many other people are also noticing.  In the last year, state police have greatly expanded their presence on social media with 19,962 followers on Twitter and 44,674 likes onFacebook.  And, the bird stories keep on coming.  On Saturday morning, Weerden posted on the state police Facebook page another bird walking on the side of the interstate highway.  “Not sure what's going on this week but now we have owls hanging out on the highway, 84 E X31 in Southington.  Animal control is en route. Hawk...owl...what's next?”

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High School raises money for Virginia State Police

A group of baseball moms from James River High School, along with Virginia State Police, held the first ever First Responder Festival.  It was inspired by the death of Trooper Chad Dermyer, who was killed at the Greyhound bus station in Richmond last March.  Today, former high school baseball players volunteered to play at the festival to honor our local first responders.  “It means so much not just for State Police but first responders everywhere to know that our communities are so supportive that they would come out and make this kind of effort event to show their support and appreciation for what we do,” said Wayne Huggins, executive director of Virginia State Police Association.  Money raised goes to the Virginia State Police Emergency Relief Fund.
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