Louisiana State Police cadets begin intensive training to become state troopers

LSP Cadet Class August 2017

A class of Louisiana State Police cadets moves on to 20 weeks of intense training Sunday, marking a new step in their journey towards becoming state troopers.  However, getting to this point wasn’t an easy task according to the cadets and their superiors.  “Well, I’m excited to have these 36 cadets report for training and hopefully move forward in their progression in becoming an LSP trooper,” State police Superintendent Colonel Kevin W. Reeves said.  After months of academy training, cadet class 96 will head to roughly 20 weeks of training in various subjects, including advanced crash investigation, cultural diversity, effective communication, and leadership skills to name a few.  “What we want to instill in them is character, problem solving abilities, and the law enforcement techniques they will need moving forward,” Reeves said.  Candidates for state police cadet class 96 were chosen after an extensive hiring process.  That process includes a written test, physical assessment, psychological evaluation, background investigation, polygraph and oral interview.  “Well, you know, I see a lot of fear a lot of the unknown. And I remember that from my first day at the training academy.  So we look forward to them progressing through the training process,” Reeves said.  Colonel Reeves is hopeful the cadets will make it through the intense training period they are facing in the coming weeks.  “I certainly hope all of them will make it through.  During the selection process we tried to select the best candidates we could, so that’s why my hope that in 20 weeks we will graduate 20 cadets,” Reeves added.  Upon successful completion of the LSP training academy, the newly graduated cadets will participate in a 10-14 week field training program before beginning their careers of dedication, protection, and service to the citizens of Louisiana.  This is something the Colonel, says the department needs.  “As you know, we're on the edge of losing a lot of employees to retirement next year.  So this will allow us to provide the safety that the public expects.”   Cadet Class 96 is the fifth state police cadet class to be held since January of 2014.  Cadet Class 95 graduated 46 new troopers on April 5th, of this year.

8/23/17

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At least 1,200 attend funeral for Virginia State Police pilot Jay Cullen, who died in Charlottesville helicopter crash

VSP Cullens funeral

The second of two state police pilots killed when their helicopter crashed after monitoring street violence in Charlottesville between white supremacists and counter-protesters a week ago was remembered Saturday by friends, family and Virginia’s governor for his quiet commitment to duty and leading the department’s air wing more by listening than talking.  A funeral for Lt. H. Jay Cullen — one day after services for his copilot — ran about two hours in the packed sanctuary of the Southside Church of the Nazarene, to which the service was moved from the Cullen family’s Methodist church to accommodate the overflow turnout.  At least 1,200 people attended, including hundreds of police officers from as far away as California and Texas, as well two former governors, state legislators, judges and Cabinet secretaries.  Col. W. Steven Flaherty, the state police superintendent who met Cullen 17 years ago, said aviation was Cullen’s passion and that he insisted on flying last Saturday because of his familiarly with the computerized video equipment the department used to coordinate the police response to the violence in Charlottesville.  It included the death of a counter-protester allegedly mowed down by a car driven by a white nationalist who has been charged with second-degree murder.  “He listened more than he talked, and when he said something, it was because he had something relevant to say,” Flaherty said of Cullen, adding — to knowing chuckles that rippled across the sanctuary — that the 48-year-old officer who joined state police in 1994 also could make his point with a “wry smile.”  Cullen’s funeral was a moving blend of emotion and precision, opening and closing with the moan of bagpipes and snap of snare drums played by officers from Virginia and other states.  After seven state police pallbearers bore Cullen’s cremated remains to a gray hearse, Gov. Terry McAuliffe presented a folded Virginia flag to Cullen’s widow, Karen, who quietly sobbed.  Police helicopters from nine states flew over the church one by one, the thwack-thwack-thwack of their rotors a tribute to Cullen.  Also — as is the custom at a police funeral — the fallen officer’s badge number is called, approximating the end-of-shift protocol when a trooper goes off duty.  Three times, Nancy Parker, a dispatcher in the Richmond division of state police, called Cullen’s badge number, 71, before announcing, “no contact.”  The ritual was broadcast by radio across the division, which included the state police aviation division Cullen joined in 1999.  In addition to McAuliffe and his wife, Dorothy, the Cullen funeral was attended by Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, the Democratic nominee for governor; Attorney General Mark Herring; former governors Tim Kaine and Jim Gilmore; House Majority Leader M. Kirkland Cox, R-Colonial Heights; Ed Gillespie, the Republican gubernatorial candidate; and Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel, R-Fauquier, her party’s nominee for lieutenant governor.  McAuliffe, among several chief executives flown by Cullen, said that Cullen — a lean, cycling enthusiast, the husband of a cancer-surviving school teacher and the father of two teenage sons — was a “silent giant” and a “serious, safety-conscious pilot” with whom the politician shared a love of dogs and sports.  “It won’t be the same when I step into that helicopter without Jay in the right front seat, with ‘Cullen’ on the back of his helmet,” said McAuliffe, who described himself and the first lady as “heartbroken” over the deaths of Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke M.M. Bates.  A funeral for Bates, a former member of McAuliffe’s security detail, was held Friday at St. Paul’s Baptist Church in Henrico County.  McAuliffe said that on Friday night he gathered with officers from across Virginia and other states in a Shockoe Bottom nightspot favored by Bates for “an Irish wake for the two Irishmen,” hoisting glasses of Jameson whiskey to the troopers.  The governor later tweeted photographs of the gathering.

8/22/17

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Nebraska graduates 19 troopers

NSP Graduation August 2017

Gov. Pete Ricketts welcomed the latest class of Nebraska State Patrol troopers Friday with an admonition to remember that they represent Nebraska.  “By putting on that uniform and serving our citizens, you are a symbol of our state,” he said.  “It’s up to you now to represent our state to the highest levels of service and integrity.”  Ricketts joined Attorney General Doug Peterson in speaking to the 15 men and three women graduating from the patrol’s training academy.  The 18 graduates were members of the academy’s 58th basic recruit class.  They took the oath of office and received their badges and law enforcement certificates in a ceremony at the State Capitol.  It was the first such ceremony since the patrol came under fire this summer for falsifying internal investigations and ignoring reports of sexual harassment.  In July, Ricketts fired then-Col. Brad Rice from the patrol’s top job for possibly interfering with internal investigations and violating agency policy.  The Governor’s Office followed up this month with a report that substantiated the allegations of interference and concluded that patrol administrators had ignored complaints from a female trooper about a highly questionable medical exam she underwent as a recruit.  At Friday’s graduation ceremony, Ricketts made reference to the problems that have surfaced in the patrol.  “We know the State Patrol has had some challenges,” the governor told the new troopers.  But he expressed confidence that the patrol will overcome its challenges and be a better agency in the future.  “I know that because I know the quality of the men and women” in the patrol, Ricketts said.  Peterson, while not directly referencing the patrol’s problems, warned recruits that one of their biggest challenges will be learning how to deal with adrenaline.  That hormone is released in times of stress and danger.  He said he has seen the effects of adrenaline in videos of encounters between law enforcement and citizens.  “I have seen great officers lose their judgment because adrenaline overtook that judgment,” Peterson said.  He also told the group that being a State Patrol trooper requires courage, wisdom and great integrity.  He advised them never to compromise on integrity.

8/21/17

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FCA US extends officer protection package to 2018 Dodge Charger Pursuit

8/18/17

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State Police increase patrols to target distracted drivers on Mackinac Bridge

MSP Mackinac Bridge

Michigan State Police have started to increase enforcement on the Mackinac Bridge due to distracted drivers taking photos and videos while crossing the bridge.  Troopers from the St. Ignace State Police Post have recently increased specific patrols of the Mackinac Bridge to target distracted and careless drivers.  State Police say there has been a steady increase of videos found on internet sites showing drivers taking photos, filming video and doing many other activities other than focusing on controlling their vehicles.  A recent focused enforcement detail resulted in several drivers contacted and educated on the dangers of distracted and careless driving.  Troopers say these poor driving habitats are particularly dangerous on the bridge during construction season. Troopers will continue with focused enforcement of distracted and careless driving on the Mackinac Bridge and will take appropriate enforcement action to discourage these behaviors.  Troopers would like to remind the public that the law prohibits drivers from operating their vehicles in a careless or negligent manner likely to endanger any person or property.  This would include a driver taking photographs or video while traversing the bridge.  Additionally, Michigan law prohibits a driver from reading, manually typing, or sending a text message while driving.

 8/18/17

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