Indiana State Trooper Surprises a Local Family on Christmas

Indiana state police chrismtasAs an Indiana State Trooper, Nicole Cheeks has seen it all. “Sometimes our jobs, it gets nasty,”said Cheeks,“But for the most part we’re dealing with 90 percent of good citizens out here. We prepare for the worst, but we usually end up getting the best.” Cheeks often patrols different parts of Terre Haute. It was in one of her neighborhoods that she met Jennifer Diekhoff and her children. “They’re good kids, they’re smart kids,” said Cheeks, “They introduced me to some things in Terre Haute that I wasn’t aware of.” One of those things being Shop With a Cop at Meijer, which happened in the middle of December. Cheeks says Diekhoff’s kids, Brandon and Hailee, told her about the event, asking her if she could be their shopping partner. However, the day of the event, the children were unable to attend. “They were really bummed out about not being able to go,” said Cheeks. Cheeks and her husband went back to Meijer following the event, picking up toys and toiletries. On Christmas Day, Cheeks delivered the load of gifts personally to the Diekhoff household. “I figured I could give back to them just for helping me,” said Cheeks. Watching the smiles of her children, Diekhoff says this Christmas is a dream come true. “It’s a blessing,” said Diekhoff, “I can’t even express how grateful we are, you know, it’s a Christmas miracle.” For 8-year-old Brandon Diekhoff and his 11-year-old sister, Hailee, it’s an experience they will always remember. When asked what they were going to say to Trooper Cheeks, in unison they said, “Thank you! You’re amazing.” In the midst of all the excitement and gifts, Cheeks hopes the Diekhoffs will unwrap the life lesson of paying it forward to others and helping those in need. “When those kids get older, they’ll do the same thing,” said Cheeks, “They’ll remember when ‘I wasn’t able to do something, someone stepped in and helped us out’ and they’ll continue to do that.

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Son of Fallen West Virginia State Trooper gets his Christmas Wish

The holiday season, for most, is a time of joy spent with friends and family, but for some it comes with a painful reminder of lost loved ones. BaileyIn 2012, State Trooper Marshall Lee Bailey was shot and killed in the line of duty, leaving a family with a gaping hole. And for his seven year old son, Wyatt Bailey, the pain of losing his father hits hard during the Christmas season. So when he asked his mom if he could drive an Army truck for Christmas, the West Virginia National Guard was all too happy to help. When a child has a special wish for Christmas most parents will do whatever they can to make sure that wish comes true. For Wyatt’s mother, Tammy Bailey, her son was no exception. Wyatt's father was a state trooper who was shot and killed in 2012, and for Wyatt not having is father for Christmas has been extremely difficult. "We get a new ornament for his father every year and hang it up on the tree, he got really sad and stopped decorating and we talked about his dad and then later we started talking about what he wanted for Christmas and he started talking about the Army tanks,” Tammy Bailey said.Wyatt’s wish this year was to be in the Army and ride an Army truck; a unique wish that his mother was determined to make happen. "I had posted on Facebook if anybody knew how to make this happen, and a friend of mine Stefany Drake and her husband Jason got it started,” Tammy said.After a few connections, the West Virginia National Guard knew exactly how to make Wyatt’s dream a reality. Governor Earl Ray Tomblin invited Wyatt and his 9-year-old sister, Lauren, to the Capitol to give them a special title. "We made him the national adjunct general of the day and we presented him and Lauren with honorary Mountaineer Brigadier so they are now officially ambassadors for the National Guard every day,” Major General Jim Hoyer said.Wyatt was given an Army uniform and got to ride in military vehicles to the Charleston armory. For the rest of the day, Wyatt was put in charge of the soldiers and airman as they toured the base. For Wyatt and his family, this was the perfect Christmas gift. "I was happy and I was proud." General Hoyer plans to invite Wyatt and his entire school class to tour the base in the near future. Wyatt said his favorite memory from the day was getting to ride in the Humvee.

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Massachusetts State Trooper Saves a Little Girl's Bear

Little Girl and Teddy

Massachusetts State Trooper Dan Mather was driving on the interstate in Milford, Massachusetts when hsaw a child’s teddy bear fly out the window of a car driving ahead of him and into traffic. What he did next made the day of a very happy little girl! Trooper Mather was able to retrieve the bear from the lane and return it to its rightful owner, Emma, and her parents, Scott and Beth. Emma was so thrilled that her mom sent a grateful note to Trooper Mather. She explained, “Emma has loved her polar bear for some time. He doesn't leave her sight. Polar goes to school with her, on vacation and everywhere Emma goes. They're inseparable and [he] gives Emma comfort.” State police said that the sweet card made Trooper Mather’s day.Line

West Virginia State Troopers of Princeton detachment play ‘Secret Santa’

“Usually, when I come up on somebody, it’s the worst moment of their day,” Trooper D.B. “David” Whited of the Princeton Detachment, West Virginia State Police said. “Not today.” Before he left on his patrol Thursday night, Sgt. A.P. Christian of the Princeton Detachment gave him four, crisp $100 bills to distribute at Secret Santa stops. Christian ordered

wv2Whited to find people who he thought could really use $100. After about 90 minutes on the detail, Whited was conducting his fourth traffic stop on an older model green Saturn on Maple Acres Road at the entrance to the Maple View Church of Christ.As he approached the driver, Whited used proper police procedures. The exchange between Whited and Michelle Thompson was certainly not a bad exchange.“She was the nicest person I ever stopped,” Whited said. Thompson handed Whited her proof of insurance without him even asking. As he brought her license and vehicle registration back into his cruiser,he was excited by how nice Thompson was. He returned to the vehicle and handed Thompson her license and registration back. She immediately came up out of her seat. “I am truly blessed,” she said as her two children looked on in amazement. “Oh dear God! Thank you Jesus!” She threw her arms around Whited’s neck and hugged him for dear life. She said that her home was recently broken into. “This is for them,” she said, sobbing as she motioned toward her children with the $100 bill in her hand. “This is for my kids.” Whited took Christian’s orders seriously. He searched for people with children riding with them. He stopped a young lady traveling on Athens Road who pulled over in front of where the Vietnam War veterans are selling Christmas trees. “She had just picked up her little sister from day care and was bringing her back home,” Whited said after returning to his cruiser. When he walked back to the vehicle and handed Veandala Coleman the $100 bill. “That’s awesome!” she said. “I’ve never been on the other end of Christmas giving before.” Whited spotted a green Ford pickup truck with a gentleman and two young children in, so he initiated a pursuit. Aaron Summers had just picked up his son and daughter, Mackenzie and Aaron Summers Jr., from a party at school. Aaron Jr., told Trooper Whited that he enjoyed eating pineapple at the party. “I didn’t know why he was pulling me over,” Aaron Summers Sr., said. “I knew I wasn’t speeding.” And of the money? “Every little bit helps when you have two young ones,” Summers said. Leona McCoy was lost, so she pulled up beside Whited who was parked on Stafford Drive, rolled down her window and asked if the trooper could direct her to the old Armory. She had the directions to the Toys for Tots distribution location written on an envelope. Whited served with the Princeton Police Department, so he told McCoy he could lead her there. “She’s going to pick up toys from the Marine Corps League’s Toys For Tots,” Whited said. “I think she could use a little help.”After he got on Mercer Street, he motioned for McCoy to pass him. He followed her for about a half-block before putting his lights on. He approached her, asked to see her license and registration and said he thought her license plate was expired. He returned briefly to his cruiser, but soon returned to give her license, registration and a $100 bill. She emerged from her vehicle with tears streaming from her eyes, and hugged Whited. “It’s just hard to do, being a single mom,” she said. “Mom is trying to help. I love my little ones so much. Oh, my God. Thank you,” she said as she hugged Whited around the neck again. She offered the only thing she could in return. “Come to Applebees, and I’ll do my best to help you,” she said. Sgt. Christian explained that this is the second year that an anonymous donor had given the detachment some $100 bills for the troopers to distribute. Christian said that he didn’t want anyone to know his name. “We don’t even know if he’s from Mercer County,” Christian said. “He just wanted the troops to give people some help for the holidays.

 

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Louisiana State Troopers deliver gifts and food to New Orleans children

Santa and Mrs. Claus arrived in style with a motorcycle police escort to the Department of Pediatrics at Tulane University School of Medicine. With lights flashing and sirens blaring the duo was dropped off at the front door on Canal Street in New Orleans on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2015. This is the tenth year that state police have generously sponsored the department's annual holiday party by providing gifts and refreshments to children in need. 

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