Basketball team wears blue for Trooper Thomas Clardy

St JohnsSt johns tributeSt. John’s always wears red and white, but before Saturday’s Division 1 boys’ basketball state final, the Pioneers were wearing blue. The St. John’s players all wore T-shirts with the words “Massachusetts State Police” across the front, but the change in uniform came for a good reason. The Pioneers wanted to support senior Tyler Clardy, whose father, Massachusetts State Trooper Thomas Clardy, was struck and killed Wednesday during a traffic stop on the Mass Pike in Charlton. “My dad is a 28-year veteran of the state police,” said St. John’s senior Joe Murphy, who scored eight points in the Pioneers’ state final defeat. “He knew Trooper Clardy personally, I’ve met him a few times. St. John’s is more than a high school it’s a brotherhood. Tyler Clardy being a senior, he’s a brother.” St. John’s wore its blue T-shirts in salute to Trooper Clardy, who lived in Hudson, during the pregame shootaround and on the bench, while several students and adult fans wore identical shirts to break with the Pioneers’ usual sea of red. Athletic director Pat White said two St. John’s alumni donated 150 shirts. “I got a phone call from the two gentleman who spearheaded this, John Quinlivan and Pat Bibaud,” White said. “They contacted me, and John said, ‘Pat, I’d really like to donate 150 shirts in support of Tyler and try to have the players wear them during the pregame and shootaround.’ ” White passed the idea on to Murphy, who was an immediate advocate, and the players decided to use the big stage — St. John’s was appearing in its first state final since 2011 — to show support for well-liked student and family. “Everybody talks about sports and winning, but it kind of shows you that for the kids who play, it’s about more than winning games,” St. John’s coach Bob Foley said. “It’s also about life and trying whatever way you can to help out a family that I’m sure is struggling right now. That’s why they wanted to support them.” White said Tyler Clardy returned to school on Friday to try to regain a sense of normalcy and that he was proud of Clardy’s poise and strength. “He’s one of those kids who if you ever forget a pencil or need a sheet of notebook paper, he’s there to help,” Murphy said. “He’s a very nice kid. He’s one of those kids you never hear a bad thing about.” Four state troopers also appeared on the sidelines for the game. White said they knew Trooper Clardy and were there to support the school’s tribute. “The Clardy family has been in our thoughts and prayers all week,” Murphy said. “State policemen are out there trying to make the world a better place. They put their lives on the line every day. I know that’s what Trooper Clardy was doing.”

   For Senior Joe Murphy's interview click here                               

 

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Tennessee State Trooper Comforts toddler on accident scene

THP and ToddlerA glimpse into the day of a local Tennessee Highway Patrol trooper has gone viral. We first shared the image Thursday night of an officer comforting a 3-year-old girl after a chase and car crash. “I felt so bad for that little girl because she was only 3 years old and she was as sweet as could be,” Trooper Mariah Harden said. Harden held that little girl for almost an hour, comforting her after a traumatizing accident. “I thought that if that was my kid I would want someone to hold on to her, let her know she’s OK,” Harden said. “I just thought that would help her, and it was helping me because I just wanted to be here for her.” The story started Thursday afternoon when the THP ended a high-speed pursuit with the child’s mother, who later crashed. “I took off that way because I knew there was a child involved,” Harden said. “I knew I wanted to get there quicker.” Trooper Harden was on scene within minutes, taking the child from the car and into her arms. “I’ve got a kid coming in not too long, so I felt like that could have been anyone’s child,” Harden said. “There’s no way I would risk my child’s life that way.” While first responders investigated and cleared the scene, Harden stayed right with the little girl, even taking the time to help fix her car seat. “Thankfully a Crockett County deputy helped me out because I’m not very good with all the straps,” Harden said. “So he helped me there and we got it set for her before she left.” For Trooper Harden, although what she did for that child is now getting a lot of attention, she said it’s all part of wearing the badge. “That could have been bad. But for a bad day it was a good one,” Harden said. “At least no one was killed, and thankfully that child was able to go home.” Since posting the photo and video online, it’s already been shared thousands of times. Harden said it’s bittersweet because Friday was actually her last day on patrol because she’s expecting a child of her own this August. Trooper harden has worked for the Tennessee Highway Patrol for only a few months. She was a graduate of the latest round of troopers.

 

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Trooper Thomas Clardy End of Watch Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Trooper Thomas Clardy

 

Our thoughts and prayers are with Trooper Thomas Clardy’s Family and the Massachusetts State Police. Trooper Thomas Clardy died from injuries he sustained in a vehicle collision on I-90, near mile marker 80 in Charlton, at approximately 12:00 pm. He was working an overtime assignment conducting accident reduction enforcement when he made a traffic stop of another vehicle. He had returned to his patrol car when another vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed crossed three travel lanes and struck him from behind. Trooper Clardy was transported to a local hospital where he died from his injuries. The driver of the vehicle that stuck the patrol car was charged criminally with negligent operation of a motor vehicle and a marked lanes violation. Trooper Clardy served with the Massachusetts State Police for 10 years and was a veteran of the United States Marine Corps. He is survived by his wife and six children.

 

Source:Officer Down Memorial Page

 

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Alameda Hitchhiker says his life was changed by Fallen California Highway Patrol Officer.

CHP TaylorAn Alameda hitchhiker has nothing but high praise for a California Highway Patrol officer who recently died in the line of duty, even though they only spent an hour together. In an act of kindness, officer Nathan Taylor drove 45-year-old Paxton Brewer from Donner Summit to Colfax during his shift. Brewer admits he’s always been a bit fearful when it comes to police officers, but within minutes of meeting a disarming officer Taylor, he says that fear quickly morphed into a life-changing bond, turning a stranger into a friend. “He made a difference. He made a difference in my life,” he said. Taylor lost his life on Sunday after an SUV hit him in snowy conditions on Interstate 80 on Saturday. Taylor was wrapping up his work on a previous accident when he was struck outside his patrol car. Brewer posted his story alongside a photo of Taylor on Monday after learning of the CHP officer’s death. He described how he was hitchhiking back to his Alameda home after busted equipment forced him to scrap a ski trip. He was at Donner Summit when Taylor pulled up to offer him a ride. “My prejudices kicked in and I expected him to be the stereotypical mean cop, but he was anything but,” he said. The 35-year-old officer agreed to take Brewer as far as he could on his shift to a rest stop near Colfax. He says the slick conditions and long drive gave way to a conversation ripe with laughs and a lot of talk about his love for the mountains. “He told me about his experiences working in San Jose, the CHP in San Jose and how much he really enjoyed working up in the mountains away from the city,” he said. Two weeks after swapping numbers, Brewer learned Taylor died. “It really helped me focus on what’s important in my life,” he said. Now, the picture from their chance encounter is a treasured memento of an unexpected friend who left a lasting impression. “He really changed my mind about what a police officer could be and really inspired me to be a better person,” he said. Taylor leaves behind a wife and three young children.

 

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First Sergeant Joseph G. Portaro End of Watch Monday, March 14, 2016

WV OD Post

 

Our thoughts and prayers are with First Sergeant Joseph G. Portaro’s Family and the West Virginia State Police. First Sergeant Joseph Portaro suffered a medical emergency while participating in a physical fitness run near the West Virginia State Police Academy, where he served as the Deputy Director of Training. He was transported to Thomas Memorial Hospital, where he passed away. Sergeant Portaro had served with the West Virginia State Police for 17 years. He is survived by his wife and three children. 

Source:Officer Down Memorial Page

 

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